2007 Grand Caravan

Tiny
SAMAR74326
  • MEMBER
  • 2007 DODGE CARAVAN
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 85,000 MILES
I have a 2007 Grand Caravan, the horn, both rear turn signals, both rear brake lights, rear hazard and both back up lights do not work. However the third brake light works and also the horn works when I lock the car with the keyless. I checked all under hood fuses, swaped all relay and disconnected the battery and still same problem. Any idea what might be wrong with my car. Thank you
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Monday, February 7th, 2011 AT 7:04 PM

5 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Isn't it wonderful when the engineers hang a silly, complicated, unreliable, unnecessary computer onto what used to be common sense, simple circuits? All the things you mentioned are run by the Body Computer and many newer models also have an Integrated Power Module under the hood. The under-hood fuse box is built into that computer module. Those computers are what allows them to design in all the toys customers demand today, but it adds to the number and cost of repairs too.

Be sure you checked fuses in two places. There should still be a fuse box under the dash, if I'm not mistaken. And there's that fuse box under the hood. If they are all good, suspect the Integrated Power Module under the hood.

Caradiodoc
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Monday, February 7th, 2011 AT 9:06 PM
Tiny
SAMAR74326
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There is no fuse box under the dash. Furthermore, there is no fuse or relay for the turn signal in the IPM under the hood. I think that should eleminate the defected IPM.
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Monday, February 7th, 2011 AT 9:19 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
That would not eliminate that module. All of the circuits you mentioned are protected by different fuses. It's not likely a whole bunch of unrelated fuses would blow at the same time. The circuits DO have the module in common. All of these systems can be activated by the mechanic through the Chrysler scanner at the dealership. If the systems will operate, you'll know the module has control over them and the control circuits are working. That means the "input" circuits aren't working. That would be the brake light switch, the turn signal switch, and the horn switch are all not working. Not likely they all failed at the same time.

Normally if the circuits don't work due to a problem in the module, there will be a diagnostic fault code stored in it. The scanner is needed to read those codes. Most aftermarket scanners used by independent repair shops are a few years behind in developing the software to access newer computers so you will be better off visiting the dealership for this problem.

Caradiodoc
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Monday, February 7th, 2011 AT 9:42 PM
Tiny
SAMAR74326
  • MEMBER
I changed the IPM as you advised, I spent over $300 and still the same probem. You are full of **** and I hope that you do not enjoy the $10 that you took from me
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Monday, February 14th, 2011 AT 10:26 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
It's not my fault if you didn't have it diagnosed by a live person who can perform tests. Do you really think we're psychic? All I have to go on is the information you provided which wasn't much. I never told you to replace any module. Based on their history of a high failure rate and on the lack of any real diagnostic tests, I suggested it was a likely item to suspect. Professionals perform all kinds of tests first to eliminate any other possibilities. It's rather hard to do that over a computer. Sometimes even the professionals have to resort to plugging in a new computer to see if that solves the problem. The difference is they can take it back out if it isn't the cause. That is one of the benefits of taking the vehicle to a shop and paying for the diagnosis.

It is possible one of the circuits that isn't working is shorted to ground and the computer is shutting one of its power supplies down to protect it. I hope you don't think I can figure that out from where I'm sitting. Most of the people on this site are trying real hard to help do-it-yourselfers such as yourself. A lot of the people who post questions here have no idea how to perform any of the necessary tests, and they can't even provide a clear description of the clues and observations, yet when there are dozens of possibilities, we are expected to know exactly which one of them is the culprit. Boy, if we were that good there wouldn't need to be any repair shops with highly trained master diagnosticians. Some mechanics attend many days of update training every year to learn how to diagnose these modern electrical systems. I wasn't a student; I was the teacher, but when it came to diagnosing a specific problem, we had the vehicle and test equipment in front of us. That's a necessity you didn't allow me.

I'm grateful you were willing to make a donation but I have never heard of anyone having a problem getting a refund. We don't even get to know how much you donated. Our responses come from our desire to help you even if you don't make any donation. I understand that a lot of people are hoping to find answers here because, like me, they are unemployed and money is tight. Most of us work just as hard to figure out answers for people who made no donation and fortunately most of them are grateful for the effort. If you can't figure out how to get a refund, (and don't read anything into that. I never tried so I don't know the procedure), I will gladly contact the site owners on your behalf. You may contact me directly if necessary.

Caradiodoc
caradiodoc@frontier. Com
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Monday, February 14th, 2011 AT 11:37 PM

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