Chev Suburban Grinding Noise in Front Wheels

Tiny
PEONY03
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 137,000 MILES
2002 Suburban 4WD LT w/autoride has a persistant dry grinding noise in the front. You hear the noise more at lower speeds and as you speed up or slow down or left off the gas or turn more to the left. It does not make the noise sitting still. I see many blogs and forums on the internet with people asking this same question.I have seen where people have the bearings replaced and the noise is still there. No one actually has an answer as to what this noise is, although I have just read over 100 notes as to people having this problem. No one has a clear cut answer as to what is wrong with the car. Can you please help me. I am a single Mom, currently laid off from my job at GlaxoSmithKline after 19 years and I do not have much money to spend fixing this problem and it still not be fixed.I also don't want anyone to take me and charge too much for something it is not. Not sure what in the world to do. Car has never given me a minutes trouble and has 137,000 miles.
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Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011 AT 9:20 PM

2 Replies

Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Symptom indicates it is something related to the wheels and being of a dry grinding nature, I would say it is something brushing against another.

Test if depressing the brake pedal slightly, not enough pressure to stop vehicle changes the noise level. If noise level changes, check the brake pads and rotor condition. Note if edges of rotor is even or has has protrusion due to wear of inner portion.

Check the brake backing plates. If they are too near the rotor, push tem away with a screwdriver and retest.
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Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011 AT 9:32 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I too have been unemployed for over two years. I saved up Advair inhalers and have just one left. When I have to start buying more they will cost me more than I spend each month for food and utilities. There goes my little savings!

Anyway, since no one has come up with an answer yet, I can suggest a different approach for your mechanic. You might even consider doing this yourself. Many auto parts stores borrow or rent tools. Ask for a "Chassis Ear". That is a set of six microphones that are clipped to suspect points under the car, then you use a switch box to switch between them and listen with headphones to find the loudest one. By moving the microphones around, you can zero in on the source of the noise. They work surprisingly well. There is a newer version that has four wireless microphones and two with wires. You have to watch where you run the wires so they don't get caught in the tires while you're driving and turning. I can copy a link to the Mac Tools web site if you want to see what it looks like. It's also available from Matco, Cornwell, and Snapon.

Caradiodoc
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Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011 AT 9:53 PM

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