My car won't pass inspection due to incomplete catalyst and evaporative codes.

Tiny
WABEL2775
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 BUICK CENTURY
  • 120 MILES
My car has two codes not allowing a pass on Texas state inspection. They are evaporative and catalyst incomplete. What do I need to do to clear them. I have replaced all the vacuum lines on the pcv system including the valve itself. I also replaced the MAF sensor and purge valve solenoid. After doing the work I had a global clear codes done at Advance Auto. They also recomended disconnecting the battery. Now I have no Check engine light but it will not pass inspection due to having more than one incomplete code. What now?
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Thursday, October 13th, 2011 AT 4:09 PM

7 Replies

Tiny
DAN_K
  • EXPERT
Put it through a complete drive cycle to clear the P1000 code. Drive it for about 10 or so miles to reset this - especially if the battery has been disconnected. A complete drive cycle (at city and highway speeds) will reset the parameters if no other faults are present.
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Thursday, October 13th, 2011 AT 4:29 PM
Tiny
WABEL2775
  • MEMBER
I have driven it multiple times up to 200 miles. When I took it back to get the inspection done it still had those codes. The tech recommended I put gas in the car between 1/2 and 3/4 tank and come back. I did this and still the same codes. What Now? Is there a special test or process I need to do?
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Thursday, October 13th, 2011 AT 4:47 PM
Tiny
DAN_K
  • EXPERT
Do you remember the specific codes? If you could provide the Pxxx #'s, this would help.
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Thursday, October 13th, 2011 AT 5:19 PM
Tiny
WABEL2775
  • MEMBER
The scanner I used did not give number codes that I can remember. The two codes the scanner returned before repairs were lean on both banks which they said was most likely the MAF sensor or a massive vacuum leak. Also the purge valve solenoid which was also replaced along with the MAF and all the vacuum lines involved with the PCV circuit. Now when I go to the sho for the inspection their computer reads incomplete on evaporative and catalyst. What do I need to do to reset the incomplete codes?
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Thursday, October 13th, 2011 AT 5:41 PM
Tiny
DAN_K
  • EXPERT
The code #'s (DTCs) would be very helpful in order for me to provide accurate advice, I'm afraid.
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Thursday, October 13th, 2011 AT 10:51 PM
Tiny
RLPOOLE66
  • MEMBER
I unferstand the question. The vehicle does not have any codes. Emissions is saying that evap. Is not ready. And the question is how do you get it ready for emisdions so that it can be tested. Je stated he has driven it over 200 miles. So the question is why is the evap system still not ready for yest? And how do you get it ready?
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Tuesday, November 12th, 2019 AT 7:33 PM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
It depends on the vehicle. There are specific items that must be met before many monitors will run. The problem there is that many of the lower end code readers cannot read all of the codes in a vehicles system and some of those will block other tests from running. In the case of the EVAP system they have different methods of running the tests depending on the vehicle. For most driving distances have nothing to do with the EVAP running.

For the 2002 Buick in this question the EVAP cycle is as follows -

Barometric pressure must be more than 65 kPa.
Engine coolant temperature must be less than 150 F.
Fuel level is between 1/4 and 3/4 tank.
Battery voltage is between 10-18 volts.

Connect a scan tool and verify that no codes are pending or present. Run the service bay EVAP test. If no codes, Start the engine, let it idle no more than 3 minutes, Drive the vehicle at part throttle and 45 mph. Until it reaches operating temperature.
Once the vehicle reaches full operating temperature drive an additional 3-5 minutes and verify if the monitor has set to yes.
If it has not then scan for any codes that may inhibit the test from completing.
For instance say you do all of the above but the car has a pending code for EVAP that doesn't turn on the light because it is a type B code (requires 2 consecutive failures before it will turn on the light) That will cause the test to abort. Now the car has to run another drive cycle as above before it will disregard that code and run the EVAP again. That means it has to set long enough for the coolant to drop below 150 F. Then it will run the test again.

On other cars there is no driving required, they actually run the test as soon as the engine is started and the coolant and intake air temperature match as well as the fuel level. Then you also have some that run the EVAP test while the vehicle cools down after it is shut off after being driven.
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Thursday, November 14th, 2019 AT 5:43 PM

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