2001 Ford Escape Fuel Pressure

Tiny
JUST199
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 FORD ESCAPE
  • 3.0L
  • V6
  • AWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 130,000 MILES
Hello. I've replaced the pump trying to diagnose my sisters hard or random no start problem. With the new pump it is still hard to start once you drive it somewhere and try to restart it. My main concern is that with just the key on the fuel pressure jumps to around 25psi then drops to 0. With it running it has a consistent 65 to 70. Why is there no pressure with just the key on? Thanks
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Thursday, October 2nd, 2014 AT 11:42 PM

6 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Fuel pumps must not run with just the ignition switch on. To do so would create a serious fire hazard if a fuel line got ruptured in a crash. They will run for about one second when the ignition switch is turned on to insure pressure is up for starting, but after that, they only run when the Engine Computer sees engine rotation, (cranking or running).

The clue you need to address is the immediate loss of pressure after that one-second spurt. That pressure can be expected to hold for weeks on some cars, but at least a few minutes on all cars. Even with a leaking fuel injector, it will take some time to lose all pressure. To be lost instantly, the most likely suspect is a leaking fuel pressure regulator or the o-ring on its nipple. I think your regulator is on the fuel rail on the engine. If it is, there will be a fuel return hose going back to the tank. Use a pinch-off pliers to pinch that hose. If pressure holds, the regulator is leaking or the o-ring is cut. That loss of pressure will cause a long crank time to start the engine. The injectors are bleeding off pressure while it's trying to build up, and the battery voltage is drawn down during cranking so the fuel pump runs slower than normal.
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Friday, October 3rd, 2014 AT 12:00 AM
Tiny
JUST199
  • MEMBER
Thank You. It us a return less system I'm pretty sure of. I went to order a regulator and they had a damper, but no regulator. I agree that it should hold that initial spurt of pressure. I appreciate the response and help.
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Friday, October 3rd, 2014 AT 12:05 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I think it's just a difference in terminology. What they refer to as a damper looks exactly like a regulator. It could be on the fuel pump assembly but from the picture it looks like there's a second port for a return line. That could be a vapor recovery port too.

If that is part of the pump assembly, did it get replaced as part of it or did you replace just the pump and motor and install them into the housing?
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Friday, October 3rd, 2014 AT 12:13 AM
Tiny
JUST199
  • MEMBER
Thanks again. I agree that the damper is identical to the regulator. I just put a new pump into the old housing. It wouldn't start before after a drive, but now it will with quite a bit of cranking though. I does only have one line running into the engine dept. I apologize for being any trouble.
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Friday, October 3rd, 2014 AT 12:19 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
What do you mean "trouble"? This is what we're here for.

You have three places fuel pressure can be lost. One is the check valve in the pump. That's relatively rare and you're eliminated that already. Most common is the regulator and o-ring. I mean this is most common for a sudden loss of pressure like you have. For pressure loss that takes up to a minute, suspect a leaking injector. To identify that, you can pull them out with the fuel rail, then watch them when you cycle the ignition switch, or you may be able to pinch the supply hose if it's not made of hard rubber. With the hose pinched, pressure will be maintained in the hose, then when you release the pinch, you'll see the pressure gauge pop up a little, then go back to "0".
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Friday, October 3rd, 2014 AT 12:31 AM
Tiny
JUST199
  • MEMBER
I respect your kindness. I removed the regulator earlier and I will replace it and go from there. If it was a GM I'd have no problems with diagnosis. I rarely work on Ford products. Thanks Again for the help and have a great day.
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Friday, October 3rd, 2014 AT 12:36 AM

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