Problems starting/running 99 Lumina

Tiny
SHANNONLUMINA
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 CHEVROLET LUMINA
  • 226,000 MILES
I have a 99 chev lumina ls which I moved yesterday and when I went back out to start it, it would not roll over - I tried boosting it, nothing I tried boosting at the starter still nothing, then my dad came home and connected wire from cylanoid to the battery and it started but will nto stay running for more then 5-10 secs any ideas?
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Tuesday, July 10th, 2012 AT 6:30 PM

8 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Sounds like multiple problems. Whatever you boosted it with had bad connections or you didn't give the car's battery enough time to charge up.

Second, once the engine was running, the generator was not working to recharge the battery and supply current for the car's electrical systems. The place to start is by charging the battery with a battery charger set to the slowest rate, for an hour or two. Remove the charger, turn on the head lights for five or ten seconds, turn them off, then measure the battery voltage. It should be near 12.6 volts. Next, start the engine and measure the battery voltage again. It must be between 13.75 and 14.75 volts. Holler back with those readings.
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Tuesday, July 10th, 2012 AT 6:37 PM
Tiny
SHANNONLUMINA
  • MEMBER
Thats the thing it's not the battery, we tried hooking up another battery and we also tried charging the battery but the battery is showing 100%, u get power when you try to start it, but it just goes tic tic thats it but like said hook the cylanoid to the battery and it will start?
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Tuesday, July 10th, 2012 AT 6:48 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Elaborate on that "tic tic". Do you mean one click each time you turn the ignition switch to "crank" or a rapid constant series of clicks like a machine gun? If it's a single click, is it a rather loud clunk or a light, barely audible click of a relay?
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Tuesday, July 10th, 2012 AT 6:55 PM
Tiny
SHANNONLUMINA
  • MEMBER
When turn the key forward all lights come on, on the dash and if you hold the key forward theres no roll over it goes tica tica twice then stops and if u keep holdin keep u head another click like something shutting off
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Tuesday, July 10th, 2012 AT 7:11 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Dandy.

You haven't told me what the battery voltage is yet.

Next, measure the voltage at the large cable on the starter. This could be a little tricky to get to. If it's easier, you can use a small jumper wire to connect that stud to the voltmeter probe so you don't have to hold onto it. You will find full battery voltage there. What is important is the reading you find while a helper tries to crank the engine. If that voltage barely changes at all, measure the voltage on the smaller wire on the starter. It will be 0.0 volts when NOT cranking the engine. See what it is when cranking.
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Tuesday, July 10th, 2012 AT 8:11 PM
Tiny
SHANNONLUMINA
  • MEMBER
We dont have the tools to check the voltage "amount", just what wires are getting power and what wires arent - but we got the car started by touchin wire from starter selanoid to the battery and it stayed running this time so that we could move it, the security light is blinking non stop and wont go off. There is a small wire on the selanoid that isnt getting any power. Any ideas? We've tried different keys and tried cleaning the keys.
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Thursday, July 12th, 2012 AT 1:53 AM
Tiny
SHANNONLUMINA
  • MEMBER
But once we shut the car off it wont do anything, no clicks now just the lights come on, on the dash and only way of getting it to start is from battery to selanoid
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Thursday, July 12th, 2012 AT 1:54 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
That small wire where you found no voltage is supposed to have no voltage, ... Until a helper tries to crank the engine. By touching a wire to it from the battery and it cranks proves you found the inoperative circuit, but now we have to figure out why.

Every specialist needs the specific tools to do the job, and so do you. Poking and touching wires isn't going to cut it. You can find a perfectly fine digital voltmeter at a Harbor Freight Tools store if you have one nearby. They cost around $7.99 and often go on sale for $2.99. You can also use a test light, but they work best when testing for no voltage or some voltage. Sometimes we need to know not just if there's some, but exactly how much. On your car a test light can work fine for an experienced mechanic but most of us aren't used to seeing the slight differences in brightness. We'll start with a test light if that's all you have.

Sorry for taking so long to get back to you. I just skidded in from the nation's second largest old car show swap meet. Left here Wednesday evening. This shouldn't happen again until this time next year.
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Monday, July 16th, 2012 AT 2:43 AM

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