Engine stalling (shutting down)

Tiny
HOWIE.RUTH@FRONTIER.COM
  • MEMBER
  • 1996 CHRYSLER SEBRING
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 91,115 MILES
Have a 1996 Chrysler Sebring Convertible JXi 6 Cyl 2.5Liter it is having a very intermittent problem of the engine losing power (shutting off)… Most of the time it is only for a brief time and then runs ok for a while… Sometimes it shut down and I have to restart the engine (which can take a little cranking before it restarts)… A couple of time the Service Engine Light came on… One time I put a scanner on it and read P1296 but most of the time the Service Engine Light does not come on. I think it could be a electrical or fuel problem but being so intermittent can not trace the problem down… Any suggestion?
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Tuesday, July 26th, 2011 AT 4:41 PM

4 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The most common cause of stalling is the crankshaft position sensor. They tend to fail when they get warm, then work again after they cool down for about an hour. The fault code, however, is related to the MAP sensor. It can cause stalling too when there's a problem in that circuit. The code makes reference to a missing 5 volt supply which would suggest there's a break in the wire feeding it, an intermittent connection in the electrical connector, or there could be an intermittent break internally.

Check the electrical connector first to see if any terminals are stretched or corroded. I never like to just throw parts at a problem but based on the code, you might try a new MAP sensor. Sometimes that's all you can do with problems that act up so intermittently.
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Tuesday, July 26th, 2011 AT 8:04 PM
Tiny
AVONLADY
  • MEMBER
Hi, I've been reading forums everywhere with the sebring issues and I now know why this guy was selling such a nice looking car on c******list for such a low price!
I have replaced the transmission so far in my '97 Sebring Convertible to the tune os $2048 and not it's time to work on the stalling issue. Unfortunately my dad is the family mechanic and he never listens to what I have to say. I told him specifically that the car will not start when it's too hot but he swore it had something to do with the ignition disregarding the temperature issue altogether.
I am about to bake a batch of brownies, print this out, and tie it to the top of the container in an envelope that reads 'TOLD U SO'. I'm glad to have come across something written in plain English.
I'm having the exact same issue except my readout is something about fuel emissions? Should I be looking into the crankshaft position sensor as well? Do I need a fuel pump too? The car has like 110, 00 miles on it.
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Friday, August 26th, 2011 AT 9:36 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Transmission problems are common today in any brand and model. It has a lot to do with making every single part as inexpensively as possibly that still gets the job done. Manufacturers make their money by selling product, not by making reliable products that don't break down and need to be replaced. They used to survive on repeat business from loyal customers, but there's so much government regulation, high wages and benefits, and competition, cost-cutting is the only place left to squeeze out a tiny profit. You and I pay for that cost-cutting in the form of numerous high-cost repairs and constant breakdowns from the insanely unnecessary and unreliable computers and cheap plastic parts. Well, ... I don't. I drive old stuff that seems to never break down, and I will until the government says I can't have those old cars. I have a bicycle ready for that day which is coming soon.

As for your stalling issue, I doubt it's related to the fuel pump. Unlike General Motors vehicles that suddenly let you sit on the side of the highway, Chrysler pumps rarely quit while they're running. Their typical problem when the brushes in the motor are worn is a failure to start up. Banging on the bottom of the gas tank often gets them going again for a few weeks.

The two most common things for stalling when hot are the crankshaft position sensor and the camshaft position sensor. The cam sensor lives inside the distributor. The ignition coil, also in the distributor, has been known to fail when hot too so most people just buy the entire rebuilt distributor. That seems to solve a lot of intermittent stalling issues, but if you have to guess, try a crank sensor first because it will have a much lower cost. You can keep the old one for a spare if it doesn't solve the problem. You might have to return your old distributor for a core, so you're out that part if it isn't the fix.
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Friday, August 26th, 2011 AT 10:36 PM
Tiny
AVONLADY
  • MEMBER
Thanks so much :)
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Saturday, August 27th, 2011 AT 5:32 AM

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