CAR STALLED OUT DRIVING AND NOW IT WONT START, ENGINE TURNS OVER JUST FINE. NO START.

  • Tiny
  • caradiodoc
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You can ask here but you should start a new thread too. I'm the only one who gets automated e-mails directing me back here when you post a reply. No one else will see your new question unless you start a new thread.

I have a '93 Dynasty with 4,200 miles and I worked for a very nice family-owned Chrysler dealership from '90 through '99 so I'm more of an expert on your Dynasty, ... Not so much on Corsicas other than suspension and alignment stuff.

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Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012 AT 9:04 PM
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  • caradiodoc
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Oh, I AM an expert on GM's charging systems. They cause a lot of problems and could cause a loss of power. It depends on what you mean though. Loss of electrical power while driving, or just a lack of engine performance?

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Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012 AT 9:06 PM
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  • sph70tech
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Okay, lol. YOU ARE THE MAN!

I started the thread just before I checked your reply.
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http://www.2carpros.com/questions/1993-chevrolet-corsica-r-r-ed-starter-car-started-battery-drained-within-20-mile

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that should direct you over there and keep it public. I would prefer it that way for both You and I. I am not the most savvy with cars but I get by fairly well. But both of these issues dropping on me with four days of each other. I tell ya, it's head-shaking stuff.
anyways, tnx for all the support thus far and I look forward to hearing from you wherever that may be.

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Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012 AT 10:12 PM
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  • caradiodoc
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Here's what I just typed a few minutes ago for a different car:

Measure the battery voltage with the engine off and with it running. You should find 12.6 volts with the engine off. Closer to 12.0 volts means the battery is good but discharged. Around 11 volts means it has a shorted cell and must be replaced.

With the engine running you must have between 13.75 and 14.75 volts. If it is low the generator won't fully charge the battery. If it is acceptable or even a little high, have the generator professionally load-tested. If "ripple" is high and the most output current you can get is one third of the generator's rated output, suspect a defective internal diode. That can leave you with insufficient current to run all the electrical stuff on the car and it will slowly run the battery down.

To continue, GM has had a real lot of generator failures, often as many as four to six replacements in the life of the car, since the '87 model year. The biggest thing that reduces the number of repeat failures is to replace the perfectly good battery at the same time unless it is less than about two years old. As they age they lose their ability to dampen and absorb the huge voltage spikes these generators produce. Those spikes destroy the internal diodes and voltage regulator.

The first thing for you to look at is if the battery warning light turns on when you turn the ignition switch to "run". That is the turn-on signal for the voltage regulator inside the generator. If it comes on, then goes off when the engine is running, measure the battery voltage and consider that load-test.

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Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012 AT 12:31 AM
  • Tiny
  • sph70tech
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The corsica was a fusible link between the starter and alt. One down and the big pain in the butt to go. Lol. Gotta get the dynasty over to the house before I can continue with any diagnostics. Might be a week or two before I touch back on this one.

I will check back for any new input someone may post.

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Thursday, October 4th, 2012 AT 10:50 PM

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