Front brake pad and rotor replacement instructions please?

Tiny
SALMINEO SALINAS
  • MEMBER
  • 2015 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN
  • 130,000 MILES
Can't find the torque sequence please I need to do the front brake can you help me please?
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Friday, June 28th, 2019 AT 2:27 PM

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Tiny
KASEKENNY1
  • EXPERT
Here is a guide that will help with this: This video shows the job being done.

https://youtu.be/jlKijXftTmw

and

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-replace-front-brake-pads-and-rotors-fwd

Plus below you will find the complete process for the pads which includes the torque specs that you will need.

Let us know if you have questions. Thanks
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Wednesday, March 3rd, 2021 AT 8:26 AM
Tiny
KASEKENNY1
  • EXPERT
In addition, here is a video on how to do this repair which will help give step by step instructions:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jlKijXftTmw

Thanks
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Monday, March 8th, 2021 AT 12:29 PM
Tiny
ABUCASH17
  • MEMBER
  • 2007 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN
  • 160,000 MILES
I need to do the brakes what will I need to make it happen?
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:25 AM (Merged)
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Hi,

Replacing front brake pads and rotors isn't too hard to do. Since they usually last around 25,000 miles, you can get lifetime parts and never have to pay for parts again.

Let's get started. First, here is a link that shows in general how it's done. You can use this as a guide when working on your vehicle:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-replace-front-brake-pads-and-rotors-fwd

Here are the directions specific to your vehicle. The pics below correlate with the directions.

__________________________________________

2007 Chevy Truck Suburban 2WD V8-5.3L
Front Disc Brake Pads Replacement (2500 Series)
Vehicle Brakes and Traction Control Disc Brake System Brake Pad Service and Repair Removal and Replacement Replacement - Front Front Disc Brake Pads Replacement (2500 Series)
FRONT DISC BRAKE PADS REPLACEMENT (2500 SERIES)
Front Disc Brake Pads Replacement (2500 Series)

Caution: Refer to Brake Dust Caution.

Removal Procedure

1. Inspect the fluid level in the brake master cylinder reservoir.
2. If the brake fluid level is midway between the maximum-full point and the minimum allowable level, no brake fluid needs to be removed from the reservoir before proceeding.
3. If the brake fluid level is higher than midway between the maximum-full point and the minimum allowable level, remove brake fluid to the midway point before proceeding.
4. Raise and support the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle.
5. Remove the tire and wheel assembly.

pic 1

6. Compress the brake caliper pistons.
1. Install 2 large C-clamps over the top of the caliper housing and against the back of the outboard brake pad.
2. Slowly tighten the C-clamps until the caliper pistons a pushed completely into the caliper bores.
3. Remove the C-clamps from the caliper.

pic 2

7. Remove the brake caliper guide pin bolts.

Notice: Support the brake caliper with heavy mechanic wire, or equivalent, whenever it is separated from its mount and the hydraulic flexible brake hose is still connected. Failure to support the caliper in this manner will cause the flexible brake hose to bear the weight of the caliper, which may cause damage to the brake hose and in turn may cause a brake fluid leak.

Notice: Refer to Brake Caliper Notice.

8. Remove the brake caliper from the brake caliper bracket and support with heavy mechanics wire or equivalent.
9. Remove the brake pads from the brake caliper bracket.
10. Note the orientation of the brake pad wear sensor (if equipped) for installation.

Important: Do not reuse the brake pad retaining springs.

11. Remove and discard the brake pad retaining springs.
12. Inspect the brake caliper. Refer to Brake Caliper Inspection.

Installation Procedure

1. Install NEW brake pad retaining springs to the caliper bracket.
2. Install the disc brake pads to the brake caliper bracket, positioning the brake pad wear sensor (if equipped) as noted during removal.

pic 3

3. Install the brake caliper to the caliper bracket.

Notice: Refer to Fastener Notice.

4. Install the brake caliper guide pin bolts.

Tighten the bolts to 108 N.m (80 lb ft).

5. Install the tire and wheel assembly.
6. Lower the vehicle.
7. With the engine OFF, gradually apply the brake pedal to approximately 2/3 of its travel distance.
8. Slowly release the brake pedal.
9. Wait 15 seconds, then repeat steps 7-8 until a firm brake pedal is obtained, to properly seat the brake caliper pistons and brake pads.
10. Fill the brake master cylinder reservoir to the proper level with clean brake fluid, if necessary. Refer to Master Cylinder Reservoir Filling.
11. Burnish the brake pads and discs. Refer to Brake Pad and Rotor Burnishing.

_______________________

Rotor Replacement

2007 Chevy Truck Suburban 2WD V8-5.3L
Front Brake Rotor Replacement (1500 Series)
Vehicle Brakes and Traction Control Disc Brake System Brake Rotor/Disc Service and Repair Removal and Replacement Front Brake Rotor Replacement (1500 Series)
FRONT BRAKE ROTOR REPLACEMENT (1500 SERIES)
Front Brake Rotor Replacement (1500 Series)

Tools Required

J 41013 Rotor Resurfacing Kit
J 42450-A Wheel Hub Resurfacing Kit

Caution: Refer to Brake Dust Caution.

Removal Procedure

1. Inspect the fluid level in the brake master cylinder reservoir.
2. If the brake fluid level is midway between the maximum-full point and the minimum allowable level, no brake fluid needs to be removed from the reservoir before proceeding.
3. If the brake fluid level is higher than midway between the maximum-full point and the minimum allowable level, remove brake fluid to the midway point before proceeding.
4. Raise and support the vehicle. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle.
5. Remove the tire and wheel assembly.
6. If installing the original brake rotor, mark the relationship of the brake rotor to the hub.

pic 4

7. Compress the brake caliper pistons.
1. Install 2 large C-clamps over the top of the caliper housing and against the back of the outboard brake pad.
2. Slowly tighten the C-clamps until the caliper pistons are pushed completely into the caliper bores.
3. Remove the C-clamps from the caliper.

Notice: Support the brake caliper with heavy mechanic wire, or equivalent, whenever it is separated from its mount and the hydraulic flexible brake hose is still connected. Failure to support the caliper in this manner will cause the flexible brake hose to bear the weight of the caliper, which may cause damage to the brake hose and in turn may cause a brake fluid leak.

Important: Remove the brake caliper bracket and the brake caliper as an assembly.

8. Remove the 2 brake caliper bracket mounting bolts.
9. Remove the caliper and bracket assembly and support with heavy mechanics wire or equivalent.

pic 5

10. Remove the brake rotor retaining push nuts from the wheel studs, if necessary.
11. Remove the brake rotor screw.

Important: Perform the following service procedures to separate the brake rotor from the wheel hub.

12. Install the wheel nuts on the wheel studs.
13. Using a deadblow hammer, strike the rotor between the wheel studs to separate the rotor from the wheel hub.
14. Remove the wheel nuts.
15. Remove the rotor.
16. If the brake rotor does not separate from the wheel hub, perform the following steps.
Clean all the surface areas and the threaded holes of contamination.
Generously apply penetrating oil or equivalent to the hub/rotor area.
Insert 2 M10 x 1.5 bolts into the threaded holes of the rotor.
Tighten the bolts evenly to force the rotor from the hub.

Installation Procedure

Notice: Any new rotor must have the protective coating removed from the friction surfaces before being placed in service. Remove the protective coating using denatured alcohol or an equivalent, and wipe the surface clean with clean cloths. Do not use gasoline, kerosene, or other oil base solvents which may leave an oily residue. This residue is damaging to the brake lining and is flammable.

Important: Whenever the brake rotor has been separated from the hub/axle flange, any rust or contaminants should be cleaned from the hub/axle flange and the brake rotor mating surfaces. Failure to do this may result in excessive assembled lateral runout (LRO) of the brake rotor, which could lead to brake pulsation.

1. Using the J 42450-A, clean all rust and contaminants from the mating surface of the hub flange.
2. Using the J 41013, clean all rust and contaminants from the inside diameter of the hat section of the brake rotor to prevent any foreign material from getting between the brake rotor and the hub flange.
3. Inspect the mating surfaces of the hub/axle flange and the rotor to ensure that there are no foreign particles or debris remaining.

Important: If the rotor was removed using the jack screw method you must ensure that the hub flange is free of nicks or marks caused by this procedure. Remove all raised nicks or marks before installing the rotor.

pic 6

4. Align the rotor to its original position on the hub, if applicable, and install the rotor.

Notice: Refer to Fastener Notice.

5. Install the brake rotor screw.

Tighten the screw to 12 N.m (106 lb in).

6. If the rotor was removed and installed as part of a brake system repair, measure the assembled lateral runout (LRO) of the rotor to ensure optimum performance of the disc brakes. Refer to Brake Rotor Assembled Lateral Runout Measurement.
7. If the rotor assembled LRO measurement exceeds the specification, bring the LRO to within specifications. Refer to Brake Rotor Assembled Lateral Runout Correction.

pic 7

8. Install the brake caliper and brake caliper bracket.
9. Perform the following procedure before installing the brake caliper bracket mounting bolts.
1. Remove all traces of the original adhesive patch.
2. Clean the threads of the bolts with brake parts cleaner or equivalent and allow to dry.
3. Apply threadlocker GM P/N 12345493 (Canadian P/N 10953488) to the threads of the bolts.

10. Install the 2 brake caliper bracket mounting bolts.

Tighten the bolts to 200 N.m (148 lb ft).

11. Install the tire and wheel assembly. Refer to Tire and Wheel Removal and Installation.
12. Lower the vehicle.
13. With the engine OFF, gradually apply the brake pedal to approximately 2/3 of its travel distance.
14. Slowly release the brake pedal.
15. Wait 15 seconds, then repeat steps 13-14 until a firm pedal is obtained to properly seat the caliper pistons and the brake pads.
16. Fill the master cylinder reservoir to the proper level with clean brake fluid, if necessary. Refer to Master Cylinder Reservoir Filling.

_____________________

I hope this helps. Let me know if you have other questions.

Take care and God Bless,

Joe

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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:25 AM (Merged)
Tiny
AIMANDERS
  • MEMBER
  • 2005 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN
  • 5.3L
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 165,000 MILES
We changed out blend motor and now no heat anywhere now it works. I need to replace the front pads and rotors?
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:25 AM (Merged)
Tiny
DANNY L
  • EXPERT
Hello, I'm Danny.

Here is a tutorial for you to view on how to change front brake pads and rotors:

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-replace-front-brake-pads-and-rotors-fwd

Since your post is for brakes I will have to answer this question first. Your blend door actuator is a different question aside from brakes and will have to be asked separately, Sorry. Here is the new question link for a new question. Just be sure to include all your vehicle information again and all the symptoms-issues for you blend door problem.

https://www.2carpros.com/questions/new

I've attached picture steps below on how to change the front brake pads and rotors on your SUV. Hope this helps and thanks for using 2CarPros.
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:25 AM (Merged)
Tiny
VOOMVOOM
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 149,000 MILES
After changing brake line n front calipers.I drive for a short while then the calipers they lock up and only release after it sits for a while. Never had a brake problem before, the lines rusted out thats why I had to touch it
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:33 AM (Merged)
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Two possibilities come to mind. Both have to do with bleeding the new lines. If you pedal bled the system, did you press the pedal all the way to the floor? If you did, there could be debris blocking the lines near the master cylinder. Normally the pistons and seals don't travel in the bottom halves of the master cylinder bores. this video will how you how.

https://youtu.be/OYmzl1LSfX0

Corrosion and debris build up there. By pressing the pedal to the floor during bleeding, (or when a hose pops), the seals can tear when they run over that crap. That will cause a sinking pedal when you hold steady pressure on it. Whether that happens or not, some of that crap could be knocked loose and sent down the lines. I think that's a stretch, but heck, . . . haven't you already looked for the simple or common stuff?

Another often overlooked problem has to do with brake fluid contamination. The slightest hint of petroleum product in the fluid will cause rubber parts to swell. Seals in the master cylinder will grow past the ports to the reservoir trapping the fluid. As the brakes heat up, the expanding fluid can't release back into the reservoir so pressure builds up that applies the brakes even harder. You might see the seal under the reservoir cap balloon up and feel soft and mushy. The only proper fix is to replace ALL rubber hoses and ALL parts containing rubber seals or o-rings, then flush and dry the steel lines. Any rubber part not replaced will leach contaminants back into the new fluid and will contaminate the new rubber parts. If this is suspected, the calipers will release when the bleeder screws are opened. This takes about a week to show up after the fluid became contaminated.

Common causes of conntaminated fluid include resetting the bladder seal in the reservoir cap with oily fingers, and using penetrating oil on hydraulic fittings. A less common, but still lethal cause is wiping out a funnel that was used for engine oil or transmission fluid, then using it for brake fluid. The slight residue is enough to cause problems.

To show my students the importance of keeping brake fluid clean, I put two wheel cylinders in two beakers half filled with brake fluid, then added one drop of engine oil to one of them and stirred it up. After a week, the contaminated one had grown by about 10 pecent and was soft and mushy. The rubber used for brake parts is definitely not compatible with petroleum products.

If this doesn't sound like it fits your problem, holler back for some more ideas.

caradiodoc
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:33 AM (Merged)
Tiny
VOOMVOOM
  • MEMBER
D latter makes sense to me as the seal under the reservoir cap got large brittle I had to replace it
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:33 AM (Merged)
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I don't like to hear that, but rather than "brittle", the bladder / seal should have been mushy. Just to be clear, a contaminated seal will be hard to force back into the reservoir. It will keep blubbering out as you chase it around. If you meant you just had to reshape the seal until it popped back into the cap, that is normal. As fluid is bled out, or as it gradually takes up the space behind the caliper pistons as the pads wear, the lower fluid level produces a slight vacuum in the reservoir. The bladder seal in the cap pulls down to keep the fluid sealed while eliminating the vacuum. I aplogize if I'm over-simplifying something obvious that you already know, but that's better than mis-diagnosing contaminated fluid.

If contaminated fluid is the problem, the calipers should release when opening the bleeder screws. The exception is if the square-cut seal in the caliper has also grown. It will not stick to the moving piston and bend slightly. The seal straightening out when the brake pedal is released is what pulls the piston away from the rotor to prevent brake drag. Still, with fluid pressure gone, the caliper will release. Normally GM has very little trouble with sticking calipers. For that reason, you should be able to easily pry the pistons back into their housings with a flat blade screwdrver, and the fluid will go back into the reservoir. If the piston will not pry back unless you open a bleeder screw, the seals in the master cylinder have grown past the return ports. That's what causes the heated and expanded trapped fluid to apply the brakes while driving.

Very sorry to say the only proper fix is to replace all rubber parts. The combination valve has rubber o-ring seals. I would be confident finding one in a salvage yard because they too give very little trouble. Watch though that there are no signs of fluid contamination on other rubber parts from that donor truck, and look for a valve assembly either with the same part number, (if you can find one), or from a truck simlar to yours. The proportioning valve part of the assembly is calibrated according to the front-to-rear weight distribution of the truck. This may be less of a concern if you have a height-sensing proportioning valve attached to the left side of the rear axle. They are often used on trucks and minivans because there can be such a wide difference in weight distribution between empty and fully loaded. That height-sensing valve has o-ring seals in it too.

Before you go through all the expense of replacing all the rubber parts, if the calipers will release with the bleeder screws open, but not when they're closed, try the same thing by loosening the steel lines at the master cylinder. That SHOULD give the same result. If you can not release the pistons that way, ... We gotta talk. Then there would appear to be something simpler and less expensive wrong. It should be fairly easy to narrow down.

Caradiodoc
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:33 AM (Merged)
Tiny
JSAUSAU
  • MEMBER
  • 1993 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN
Having trouble removing front rotor from bearing hub. This is a 2500 heavy duty suburban. Any help will be greatly appreciated.
Thanks,
js
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:34 AM (Merged)
Tiny
BLUELIGHTNIN6
  • EXPERT
If caliper has been removed and rotor seems stuck on then bang on it with a rubber headed mallet to jar it loose. Hit in between the lugs, close to the center of rotor.
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:34 AM (Merged)
Tiny
TRK63
  • MEMBER
  • 1991 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN
  • V8
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 250,000 MILES
How tight should the lock nuts holding the rotor in place be?
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:34 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MASTERTECHTIM
  • MEMBER
Not wicked tight. The best way to try to describe it to you is, first slowly snug the nut until the rotor has absolutely no play in and out then tighten the nut 1/4 turn and put in cotter pin. That should put you right on the money. I hope this helps
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:34 AM (Merged)
Tiny
CHILE23
  • MEMBER
  • CHEVROLET SUBURBAN
I got a 1984 chevy suburban 4x4 350 1/2 ton and in my manual it doesnt really explain on how to take off the brake rotors and it seems more difficult due to the vehicle being 4x4 if you got any tips or any help please send it thanks chile23
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:36 AM (Merged)
Tiny
BLACKOP555
  • EXPERT
First thing is first jack up car and support with jack stands. then take off the wheel. this video will help

https://youtu.be/CQTfR7qiUMA

next disassemble the braking system, take off the brake pads and mark then and then take off the calipers. this should leave the rotor left, of course the rotor will probably be jammed on there due to all the wonderful stuff on the road during the winter and rust.

so if you have a torch heating it up could help with prying it off. be careful not to ruin anything.
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:36 AM (Merged)
Tiny
PSERACUSE
  • MEMBER
  • CHEVROLET SUBURBAN
I recently had a friend help me replace my brake pads on my 97 suburban and in the process he also had the discs and drums turned (is that the right word?). This was less than a month ago and less than 2000 miles ago. I just noticed that my brakes feel really bad - metal on metal. I took it back over and after taking the brakes apart, he noticed that the pad on the driver's side have almost completely worn and the pad on the passenger front are completely gone and the disc is scored.

Although he knows a lot about cars, it seems too coincidental to me that the brake pads on both sides wore so quickly after the change and that there may be something that is specific to suburbans that maybe was overlooked in the pad replacement. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated as I don't want to repeat the same situation in the next 2000 miles.

Thanks for any help
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:36 AM (Merged)
Tiny
CHEII
  • MEMBER
Hi
what did you guys use to depress the caliper pistons? If you didnt use a pad tool there is a chance you may have cocked the pistons in the calipers causing this problem, the easiest way to check is to take the calipers off crack the bleeders and see if the pistons move at all or struggle to go back in

Jim
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:36 AM (Merged)
Tiny
ANOTHERVIEW
  • MEMBER
My guess would have been bad pads.

I don't know how the calipers not moving well would cause the pads to disintegrate. That does not mean it won't. The other responder knows a lot more than do.

Although, did you test it before you put the tires back on? Did you spin the wheels, and press the brakes a few times to see how it functioned?
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 10:36 AM (Merged)
Tiny
NUNEZJM
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 49,000 MILES
Can you tell me how to change the front brake pads on my Suburban?
And what kind of tools would I need?
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Monday, March 15th, 2021 AT 11:41 AM (Merged)

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