76 Beetle brake trouble

Tiny
MSMOMMA
  • MEMBER
  • 1976 VOLKSWAGEN
I just had a master cylinder on my 76 beetle go bad. I have replaced it and bled the brakes. I still have no brakes. The back bled just fine, when I bleed the front the pedal will not drop to floor. Any suggestions as to what my problem may be?
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Tuesday, June 5th, 2007 AT 12:06 AM

6 Replies

Tiny
M_H_RITZEL
  • EXPERT
The brakes bleed out all right but you still do not have brakes, try bleeding the master cylinder, then the brakes again.
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Tuesday, June 5th, 2007 AT 11:35 AM
Tiny
MSMOMMA
  • MEMBER
How do I bleed the master?
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Tuesday, June 5th, 2007 AT 8:55 PM
Tiny
M_H_RITZEL
  • EXPERT
When you say the back bled out fine and the front did not what happened? When you bleed a brake line and the line is opened the brake will go to the floor then you close the line. Let me know what happened.
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Wednesday, June 6th, 2007 AT 7:43 PM
Tiny
BEAVISRYAN
  • MEMBER
I also am having the same problem. My girlfriend brought her bug (type1) to a garage for a general tune up, oil change and some minor tire reapirs. While there, the mechanic had adjusted her brake pedal closer to her seat. Since taking her car back the brake pedal has been steadily getting worse, to a point now that when the pedal is to the floor the car only slows, it can't be stopped fully immediately.

The brake reservoir was still full and I couldn't see any leaks any where. I replaced the master cylinder and both front brake lines. I bled the master cylinder first. *I've never had to do that before, but I just cracked the 3 lines (one line goes to the back and two to each front wheel) one at a time and pumped the brake till fluid leaked past the fittings.

I then proceeded to bleed the brakes starting from the farthest wheel from the master cylinder. The rear brakes bled fine, the pedal got stiffer, then when I started bleeding the front brakes the pedal started to go back to the floor and the oil wouldn't spurt out like the rear bleeders. Should I bleed the brakes again? Is there an adjustment for the shoes? Thanks!
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Tuesday, June 26th, 2007 AT 9:51 PM
Tiny
M_H_RITZEL
  • EXPERT
Start at the master cylinder. Loosen up the lines on the master cylinder. Make sure you have something there to catch any brake fluid that comes out so it does not get it all over. If the pedal goes down then tighten the lines and do one brake at a time at the brake cylinder. Check for any pinched lines. The wheel cylinder could be bad but I would check each line first before proceeding to the wheel cylinder itself.
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Thursday, June 28th, 2007 AT 8:13 AM
Tiny
JBCLEM
  • MEMBER
If you don't mind me jumping in. On old VW's with old brake hoses, it's not unusual for the brake hose to deteriorate internally and become partially, or completely, plugged up. The brake pedal will initially feel somewhat hard, then go soft as the fluid slowly gets by the blockage.

If you don't get much fluid or pressure coming out of a bleeder you need to disconnect(unscrew) the hose from the wheel cylinder and see if pumping the brake pedal will push fluid out the end of the disconnected hose. If nothing, or very little, then remove the brake hose and try to blow through it with compressed air, or try to pour fluid in one end and see how much comes out the other end. This will give you an idea of the amount of blockage.

Although you can sometimes run a wire through the hose and clean out the blockage, this is purely a desperation measure. Old hoses, especially cracked ones, or ones with soft or thin spots, should be replaced for safety's sake.

Jc
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Saturday, June 30th, 2007 AT 5:12 AM

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