Timing engine and it will not start

Tiny
JSALZ
  • MEMBER
  • 1994 FORD F-150
  • 5.0L
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 156,000 MILES
Put the engine at 10 BTDC and set the distributor rotor to the first spark plug boot on the cap. The truck does not start. Anything else I can try?
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Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 AT 3:23 PM

15 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Was the distributor recently removed? What leads you to suspect the orientation of the shaft changed? Have you actually checked for spark? What about fuel pressure? Has anyone read the diagnostic fault codes?
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Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 AT 5:00 PM
Tiny
JSALZ
  • MEMBER
Yes new distributor was installed, and I have spark. I did not check fuel pressure, but put all new injectors and rebuilt the whole engine.
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Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 AT 5:26 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Try starting fluid. If the engine fires for a few seconds, we will need to look at the injectors to see if they are firing.
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Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 AT 6:55 PM
Tiny
JSALZ
  • MEMBER
The truck was running, but it was backfiring a little.
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Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 AT 7:16 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
When that happens to me, it is usually because I, (the expert), have two or more plug wires in the wrong place. Of course, I will never admit that.
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Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 AT 7:29 PM
Tiny
JSALZ
  • MEMBER
Once I get it running again I will look at that.
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Wednesday, December 7th, 2016 AT 7:46 PM
Tiny
JSALZ
  • MEMBER
Have fuel pressure and setting it to 10 BTDC and not starting. Anything else I can try?
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Thursday, December 8th, 2016 AT 1:47 PM
Tiny
CJ MEDEVAC
  • EXPERT
Maybe I read you wrong.

You set the harmonic balancer to 10 degrees before, then you twisted number one on the distributor to match/ mate/ sync with the balancer.

You need a timing light and a dwell/ tach meter to set the timing!

Maybe I misread you!

What was the technique actually used?

The Medic
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Thursday, December 8th, 2016 AT 4:49 PM
Tiny
JSALZ
  • MEMBER
Do you have to have the rotor pointing 10 degrees? And just following what the book says, but it is not starting and I have the timing light. But was going to use it once it is running to make sure.
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Thursday, December 8th, 2016 AT 4:57 PM
Tiny
CJ MEDEVAC
  • EXPERT
Sorta scan thru this link till you get to the timing part!

Yours will work similar/ ask us more if you get all bumfuzzled!

https://www.2carpros.com/questions/jeep-cj7-1985-jeep-cj7-stalls-when-hot

I wrote those answers like 6 years ago, still sorta 'green' with computer usage!

Waitin' on good news! Or the need for further guidance

The Medic
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Thursday, December 8th, 2016 AT 5:06 PM
Tiny
JSALZ
  • MEMBER
Would you be able to tell me the process to do it
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Thursday, December 8th, 2016 AT 5:44 PM
Tiny
JSALZ
  • MEMBER
For the timing of the 94 Ford F-150
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Thursday, December 8th, 2016 AT 5:45 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
It sounds like the confusion is in where the rotor should be pointing. Pointing to number one cylinder when it was at top dead center was a Chrysler small block thing, (273, 318, 340, and 360) many years ago, but it was just a coincidence. What you need to do is place the crankshaft at top dead center, but it has to be on cylinder number one's compression stroke. Then look where the distributor rotor is pointing. On the distributor cap, put number one spark plug wire on the tower closest to the tip of the rotor. You must remove the spark plug, then stick your finger on the hole and have a helper crank the engine to know you're on the compression stroke. It's easier to do that if you do it yourself by using a jumper wire on the starter relay.

You can also borrow a whistle that screws into the spark plug hole to find TDC. It will stop whistling when the piston gets to TDC on the compression stroke while turning the crankshaft by hand.
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Friday, December 9th, 2016 AT 9:27 PM
Tiny
JSALZ
  • MEMBER
1994 Ford F-150 5.0 idle at 1500 while in park, drops down to 900 in reverse and drive, is this accurate?
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Thursday, March 2nd, 2017 AT 3:26 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
If it's idling at 1500 rpm once the engine is warmed up, that is too fast. 800 is typical.

There's two coolant temperature sensors. A single-wire sensor is used for the dash gauge. A two-wire sensor is used for the Engine Computer. Both types have an extremely low failure rate because they have just one component inside them. However, in the early '90s, Ford had a lot of trouble with their two-wire coolant temperature sensors. The most common problem was an erratic reading. The Engine Computer increases idle speed at colder temperatures, and the erratic readings resulted in erratic idle speed. A less-common symptom was the sensor read a temperature colder than the actual temperature, but the readings were steady. The result was an idle speed that was too high.

The way to find this is to connect a scanner so you can view live data and see what the computer is responding to. If the dash gauge reads normal, and you get nice hot air from the heater, you know the engine is reaching normal temperature. If the coolant temperature sensor shows 140 degrees, for example, suspect the sensor is not reading properly.

If you find the temperature displayed is too low, and the air from heater is cool, suspect the thermostat is stuck open and the engine really isn't getting hot enough. That will keep idle speed too high.
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Thursday, March 2nd, 2017 AT 4:53 PM

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