Ticking coming from car

Tiny
CHYANNE SHERIFF
  • MEMBER
  • 1992 CHEVROLET CORSICA
  • 3.1L
  • V6
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 260,000 MILES
My car is ticking now after having to remove oil pan to remove broke CPS. It has new gasket and new oil (10w30). Car runs fine and starts ticking after ten minutes of driving. Ticking does stop eventually. Checked the oil and it is full. Checked oil when cold and not running and no oil on dipstick. Start the car for couple seconds and checked the oil. Now see oil on dipstick. The oil cap says use 5w30. Could this cause the ticking?
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Friday, February 24th, 2017 AT 11:09 AM

3 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
No oil on the dip stick? You found the cause of the problem. What little oil is in the engine will splash onto the dip stick when the engine is running. That is why we always wipe it off, then stick it back in when checking the level.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
+1
Friday, February 24th, 2017 AT 6:08 PM
Tiny
CHYANNE SHERIFF
  • MEMBER
Thank you for answer to my question. When I checked the dipstick after starting the car the dipstick showed it was overfilled with oil. That was confusing me why the car was ticking. It did it again this morning so I added a quart of 5w30 and the ticking stopped. It was the lifters ticking. Also, after wiping the dipstick and checking it again it still shows overfill. So if the dipstick shows no oil without starting the car the oil level is low? Why does it show overfill when car is running and how much oil is really in the car? Will it hurt the car if I add more oil to stop ticking?
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Saturday, February 25th, 2017 AT 9:17 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
First of all, do not check the level while the engine is running. It's being pumped around and up to the top of the engine, so it is going to be low down in the bottom, by the dip stick. I saw the results in the late '80s after a fellow kept adding oil to his VW while it was running. It still didn't read "full" after adding five quarts, and it was only supposed to hold 4.5 quarts. By the time he made it a half mile, oil was getting pushed past the piston rings, and since it was a diesel engine that runs on oil, it was running wide open while a bunch of spectators were standing there watching it self-destruct. By the time I got there with a stack of wet rags to snuff it out, it already had stuff oozing from every gasket. The engine died just as I ran up to it. If he had had the presence of mind, it had a manual transmission, and he could have just stuffed it into fifth gear and used the clutch to stall the engine.

You don't have to be concerned with a little extra oil, but that guy had more than twice the amount called for. That makes the level so high that the spinning crankshaft slaps the oil and whips air into it. Air can be compressed, and that prevents the oil from doing its job.

Also, as I mentioned previously, oil is supposed to be getting sprayed onto some internal parts, and that can make it splash onto the dip stick. That is why it is always necessary to wipe the dip stick off first, then poke it back in to take the reading.

Sometimes the oil in the top of the engine takes some time to run back down. For that reason, stop the engine, then wait for perhaps as much as two minutes before wiping off the dip stick and taking the reading. The level will always be a little higher after the engine has been off for a few hours.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Sunday, February 26th, 2017 AT 10:03 PM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides