After replacing the throttle pedal or accelerator pedal position sensor, it will not accelerate?

Tiny
DANNY HUDSON
  • MEMBER
  • 2013 DODGE AVENGER
  • 3.6L
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 167,500 MILES
I was getting codes of throttle pedal position sensor low voltage. Also, I replaced the throttle body and replaced the pedal, but I go to mash the accelerator down and I have nothing it does not accelerate whatsoever. What could be wrong now?
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Sunday, July 17th, 2022 AT 7:26 AM

5 Replies

Tiny
AL514
  • EXPERT
Hello, depending on the exact code number there are two throttle position sensors built into the Throttle Body, and there are two Accelerator Pedal Position sensors on the gas pedal. I'll put diagrams and instructions for both.
For the Throttle Body, there is one 5-volt Reference Feed, two Signal wires TP1 and TP2, and one TP sensor Return (Ground). The first diagram is the throttle body pinout. Since you actually got a TPS code, checking the throttle body first would be recommended. If you unplug the 6-wire connector on the throttle body, turn the key to just the "on" position, engine off. Using a basic multimeter, put the red lead on the pink/yellow wire and the other lead on the brown/dark blue wire, you should read 5-volts. But if you can give us the actual codes it would be faster so we can test the correct circuit without going through all the others.
Testing for the APP sensor is below. But most likely you are missing 5-volts at the Throttle Body.

For the Accelerator Pedal Position sensor, even though you replaced the sensor, you need to check that the sensor is receiving its Reference Voltage, Ground and Signal wires. If the Reference Voltage is low, the Signal will be low too. Here is a pinout to the sensor. It's a double APP sensor. So, it has two 5-volt Reference wires, two Grounds, and two Signal wires going to the ECM. This is known as a Drive By wire system. The ECM controls the throttle plates and throttle body. The APP sensor is an Input to the ECM. So, you can unplug the sensor on the pedal, and with the Key On, engine off, as you can see from the diagram pins 3 and 6 are the 5-volt Ref. So, if you take a basic multimeter and on a voltage setting, put the red lead on pin 3 and the black lead on pin 2 (which is the sensor ground) you should read 5-volts. Do the same with pins 6 and 5 should also read 5-volts.
If for some reason you are missing one of the 5-volts readings, further diagnosing is needed. There are lots of sensors on the vehicle that use the 5-volt reference. And if one of those other sensors is shorted out, it will affect the 5-volt reference for other sensors.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-use-a-voltmeter

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-check-wiring
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Sunday, July 17th, 2022 AT 9:08 PM
Tiny
DANNY HUDSON
  • MEMBER
I'm getting five volts to the throttle body 6-pin plug and I'm getting 5 volts to the throttle pedal 6 pin plug on six and five and three and two from the pedal. It did not start this until after I replaced the catalytic converters, could crankshaft sensor or camshaft sensor have something to do with it or the O2 sensors on the cats?
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Wednesday, July 20th, 2022 AT 3:47 PM
Tiny
AL514
  • EXPERT
It depends, are you still getting any codes for the TPS or APP sensors? What I think it happening, since you don't seem to be missing any of the 5-volt references, is since you replaced the throttle body, the ECM might need a throttle body relearn procedure done with a scan tool. I don't really see how the Cat replacement or Oxygen sensor would cause this, unless a Ground wire or some bulk connector was left unplugged or loose. Since you're not getting any throttle response, it seems more like the ECM is not seeing any throttle request. Or if there are codes still stored in the ECM and the car went into Limp Mode and the ECM is seeing a fault that is preventing the throttle from being opened. A full system scan might show a code somewhere in another module, or a lack of communication. I'm not sure how much you had to take apart to do the work you did; I would recheck all your Ground connections and make sure they all got bolted back on where they were. Go through the steps you took and see if there's a connector or wire hanging down somewhere.
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Wednesday, July 20th, 2022 AT 6:20 PM
Tiny
DANNY HUDSON
  • MEMBER
  • 2013 DODGE AVENGER
  • 3.6L
  • V6
  • 2WD
  • 168,164 MILES
In the last article that I asked a question in I changed out my catalytic converter and I was getting nothing it would not crank. Come to find out all my plugs will filled change my plugs out go to crank it up it cranks, but then they put it in gear and watch the accelerator it will not do nothing will not go. It is throwing several different codes starting with p0523, p1618, p2122, p0123, and p0222. I've already changed out the accelerator pedal which has a sensor mounted on it or in built into it already and I went to a junkyard and got a new throttle or a used throttle body which has the sensor on it and replaced it as well I still have nothing.
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Monday, August 1st, 2022 AT 3:16 PM (Merged)
Tiny
KEN L
  • ADMIN
There are many throttle system related codes here, is the newly installed throttle bore clean inside? Also, how do the wiring and electrical connectors look has the car been in heavy rain? You may have a corrosion problem. There is a learning procedure when you replace the throttle actuator here are the instructions on how to do the job in the diagrams below. Also, can you clear the codes and then turn the key on without starting the engine and then scan it again to see which codes come up, these will be the hard codes we need to focus on. Check out the diagrams (below). Please let us know what happens.
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Monday, August 1st, 2022 AT 3:16 PM (Merged)

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