Stalling out when put in gear

Tiny
MCAVOY85
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE
  • 4 CYL
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 160,000 MILES
Car runs fine in park dies as soon as I put it into drive or reverse unless I keep gas going to it. I'm hoping it's not something that involves pulling tranny. I read it could be a crack in air duct hose, where is it and how do I check or is this most likely not the problem?

Ty for assistance will be super appreciated trying to get car run to sell it will make a donation if u can help fix it and get it sold
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Friday, November 7th, 2014 AT 12:22 AM

9 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Was the battery recently disconnected or run down? If it was, the Engine Computer has to relearn "minimum throttle" before it will know when it has to be in control of idle speed. To meet the conditions for the relearn to take place, drive at highway speed with the engine warmed up, then coast for at least seven seconds without touching the pedals?

Or is this a sudden jerk and the car stalls immediately? Meaning the torque converter has fallen apart and needs replacement. This means removing the transmission.

Please let us know what you find.
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Friday, November 7th, 2014 AT 12:59 AM
Tiny
MCAVOY85
  • MEMBER
Yes battery was just replaced I will try it and let you know if that works. The neutral symbol was also blinking.
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Friday, November 7th, 2014 AT 8:01 AM
Tiny
MCAVOY85
  • MEMBER
The car runs after putting more fluid I'm and doing like you said but jerks when put in drive and neutral light still blinking, I read this is a fail safe mode. So is it torque converter?
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Friday, November 7th, 2014 AT 9:59 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I only know three things and the minimum throttle relearn is one of them. Mitsubishi and Chrysler have a lot in common, and this is one of those things. Now you're into something I'm not familiar with. Chrysler's "limp mode" is to default to second gear and stay there. That pertains to the transmission. As far as how they indicate that to you is different on various models. On older cars the Check Engine light turned on and the diagnostic fault code was # 700 which just meant there was another diagnostic fault code stored in the Transmission Computer. You need a scanner that can access that computer to read the codes.

By the late '90s the indication of limp mode was all the shift indicator lights on the instrument cluster for every gear lit up at the same time. To get it out of limp mode you have to turn the ignition switch off, then restart the engine.

There isn't much that can go wrong with a torque converter, and of the hundreds of potential fault codes, only a few relate to it. Typical failures include fluid leakage, a vibration at highway speed, and a failure of the clutch to lock up. The clutch only locks up above about 45 mph and in fourth, and maybe third gear, and only after the engine is warmed up. If you have a tachometer on the dash, you can verify the lockup clutch is working by tapping the brake pedal. With the engine warmed up, drive at highway speed, and hold the accelerator pedal perfectly steady. Tap the brake pedal momentarily with your left foot. You should see engine speed pick up about 200 rpm, then drop back down a couple of seconds later. If you don't have a tach, you can usually hear the increase in engine speed too.

If there is a problem with the transmission, you'll need to have a mechanic connect a scanner to read the fault code(s). Sometimes you can get an idea of what kind of problem there is by observing when it goes to limp mode, or fail safe mode. If you start the engine, shift into "drive", and it starts out in second gear right away, (at least for Chrysler products), it's usually electrical in nature and most commonly due to a failed sensor. If it starts out in first gear like it's supposed to, then bangs back to second gear during or right after a shift, it's usually due to slippage in a clutch pack. On the Chryslers the mechanic can read the "clutch volume index", (CVI) with the scanner. That's a set of four numbers corresponding to the volume of fluid it takes to apply each clutch pack. With those numbers an experienced transmission mechanic can tell how much life is left in each clutch pack. When a certain number is reached, slipping can be expected, and that will trigger a fault code and send the system into limp mode. The transmission has to be rebuilt to take care of that.
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Friday, November 7th, 2014 AT 2:12 PM
Tiny
MCAVOY85
  • MEMBER
It's having all symptoms u listed for torque converter. Starts in third gear.
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Sunday, November 9th, 2014 AT 11:25 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I'm not clear in your reply. I said, "Typical failures include fluid leakage, a vibration at highway speed, and a failure of the clutch to lock up". You said yours starts out in a high gear, and I assume it stays there. That would be limp mode or fail-safe mode. Limp mode is the result of a problem, not the cause of it. You need to have a mechanic connect a scanner to read the fault codes in the Transmission Computer to see which circuit or system needs further diagnosis.
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Monday, November 10th, 2014 AT 2:11 AM
Tiny
MCAVOY85
  • MEMBER
Oh ok thanks a bunch, think I just misinterpreted. Have a buddy coming today with a scanner & I'll post the codes, thanks again for your help. Sorry my responses aren't very elaborate, I'm posting from my phone.
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Monday, November 10th, 2014 AT 8:43 AM
Tiny
MCAVOY85
  • MEMBER
Ran the scan says p0740 torque converter clutch.
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Thursday, November 13th, 2014 AT 1:26 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
That tells you the circuit that needs further diagnosis. You might try activating the clutch with the scanner if it gives you that option. I'm not sure how that would relate to engine stalling. Normally the solenoid is open or there's a corroded terminal in a connector, and those lead to the clutch not locking up at highway speed.
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Friday, November 14th, 2014 AT 1:00 PM

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