Shocks

Tiny
VIC1987
  • 1997 FORD F-150
  • 4.7L
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 157,298 MILES

I put new shocks on my truck (rear), but my truck did not lift from the back like I thought it would, do I need to jack it up? It was my first time doing it.

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Tuesday, February 16th, 2016 AT 6:09 AM

8 Replies

Tiny
JOHNNYT73
  • EXPERT
  • 943 POSTS

If you replaced them with shocks that are like the originals then you should not expect any lift. What would jacking it up do? Do you mean installing a lift? The leaf springs are what really hold the weight.

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Tuesday, February 16th, 2016 AT 6:16 AM
Tiny
VIC1987
  • MEMBER

Oh thanks, no just original shocks, I'm not planning to lift it yet, but I will look into the springs.

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Tuesday, February 16th, 2016 AT 6:27 AM
Tiny
SPARV
  • 2012 FORD F-150
  • 5.0L
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 140,000 MILES
  • MERGED

Does heavy dury shocks/suspension cause truck to bounce around and feel every bump in the road? Is this normal for a truck w/heavy duty suspension? Just purchased used Ford F-150 and the salesman says this is the norm for Ford trucks w/heavy duty shocks/suspension

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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 2:54 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
  • 26,467 POSTS
  • MERGED

Absolutely. If you want a truck to ride like a car, you're going to get the same weight-carrying-capacity as a car, (meaning none). Springs have to be really stiff to hold up the weight of a load. Front coil springs provide a better ride than the leaf springs often used decades ago, but the front doesn't have to work as hard as the rear.

A compromise is stepped rear leaf springs. Those use only half of the spring so the ride is smoother, but as weight is added and the rear settles, it hits the second half of the springs which increases the load-carrying capacity. Some trucks, particularly Dodge dually diesels, come with those springs. An F-150 is a relatively very light truck so it likely has standard rear springs. You might investigate at the dealer if lighter springs, or stepped springs are available. With lighter springs, there are also aftermarket air springs that can be added. Some of those kits include an on-board compressor, and control and pressure gauge inside the cab.

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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 2:54 PM
Tiny
RMOSS91
  • 1994 FORD F-150
  • 4.9L
  • 6 CYL
  • RWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 144,327 MILES
  • MERGED

I was going to buy new shocks today they asked me if it had quad cab suspension I told them I didn't know and id be back tomorrow. How do I find out the vin has a y in it

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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 2:54 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
  • 20,638 POSTS
  • MERGED

It's "quad suspension" not "quad cab suspension"

It means you would have 4 shocks in the front instead of two if you have the quad package.

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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 2:54 PM
Tiny
DGREBCW3R
  • 1995 FORD F-150
  • 212,000 MILES
  • MERGED

Have new shocks. Hit a bump doing sixty and front end started vibrating violently. What are the possibilities? Wheels out of balance, alignment? Steering is fine. Wheel bearings are tight. Brakes redone one year ago.

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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 2:54 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
  • 20,638 POSTS
  • MERGED

You could have bent a wheel or ruptured a steel belt in the tire. Run the car with the wheels elevated and see how true they spin.

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Tuesday, December 20th, 2016 AT 2:54 PM

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