Transmission rebuild instructions please?

Tiny
AB AUTOMOTIVEREPAIR TRANSMISSIONS
  • MEMBER
  • 2011 FORD F-150
  • 5.0L
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 249,000 MILES
I didn't want to tackle it, but with business how it is, I reluctantly agreed, (I under quoted it!) And I got bit by the E Drum, no fifth and sixth gear. I put new seals in it, and the drum holds perfect when air checked. When I assemble the entire gear train, I see that it also pressurizes the shaft going all the way to the back of the transmission and it doesn't air check. I installed a omega machine bushing kit in it ($122.00). What advice does anyone have to make this run right?
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Tuesday, January 7th, 2020 AT 9:04 AM

15 Replies

Tiny
KEN
  • ADMIN
There is a specific way the drum and clutch go together here is what the book says about the issue in the diagrams below. Here are the instructions on rebuilding the transmission in the diagrams below.

"3. NOTICE: Compress the snap ring out of the groove 180 degrees from the snap ring gap or damage to the forward clutch hub can occur."

There are many note and tip on installing the clutch disc. Check out the diagrams (below). Please let us know if you need anything else to get the problem fixed. Can you please shoot a quick video with your phone so we can see what's going on, that would be great. You can upload it here with your response.
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Wednesday, January 8th, 2020 AT 11:37 AM
Tiny
AB AUTOMOTIVEREPAIR TRANSMISSIONS
  • MEMBER
  • 2004 FORD F-150
  • 5.4L
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 1,234 MILES
Is riveted sun gear shell interchangeable with non riveted sungear shell in 4r70w?

Here are part numbers: 76624BK (fits 93-15) and 76624C (fits 04-15).
I believe the 76624C has a riveted shell. I'm just concerned about the ISS reading correctly.
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Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 AT 10:12 AM (Merged)
Tiny
KASEKENNY1
  • EXPERT
Your concern is on the right path. You need to stick with the one that came out. The non riveted is non magnetic so it is different. Take a look at these charts. There is a separate listing for each one.

Also, is there a reason you are replacing this? These sun gears are fine to reuse unless the races inside the unit are scored or the teeth on the gears are damaged.

I have rebuilt a lot of 4r70's and have not had to replace this very often. In fact, I can't remember when I did. I am sure I have but it has been so rare that I can't remember. Basically if you inspect it and find no sign of damage then I would just reuse the original.
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Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 AT 10:12 AM (Merged)
Tiny
AB AUTOMOTIVEREPAIR TRANSMISSIONS
  • MEMBER
Unfortunately the original was that one in a bunch that couldn't be reused. We're out in NJ with bad roads and people that are towing that shouldn't. Just our luck.
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Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 AT 10:12 AM (Merged)
Tiny
KASEKENNY1
  • EXPERT
Understood. I am familiar with those customers in NJ that think because they have a hitch and as long as the trailer hooks up to it then the vehicle can tow it. I have denied many transmission claims under warranty due to overloading.

Thanks for the update. Talk to you next time. Thanks
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Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 AT 10:12 AM (Merged)
Tiny
AB AUTOMOTIVEREPAIR TRANSMISSIONS
  • MEMBER
Do you mind if I ask you, if you sell a rebuilt transmission, how can you prove that they are overhauling if they are installing themselves?
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Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 AT 10:12 AM (Merged)
Tiny
KASEKENNY1
  • EXPERT
Basically you will want to see the vehicle first and foremost. If there are other signs of overloading on the vehicle then that will add to the case.

If only looking at the transmission you want to tear it down and see what actually failed based on their complaint. The common complaint of overloading is flaring during shifting, first gear slipping, overdrive issues.

Basically when you tear it apart you are looking for signs of heat. Overloading causes transmission to get hot and heat is not its friend. Burned clutches causing the complaints. So clutches for first gear or the flaring gear or overdrive is burned up. Hot spots or bluing on drums and pistons.

If they just put the vehicle in, it is highly unlikely that there is an issue in the transmission that would cause this. So you want to then inspect all the seals for cuts or other sources of pressure loss/bleeding.

If you find nothing wrong with the unit other then the burned up clutches then the most likely cause is overloading. Clearly we can never be 100% when it comes to these things unless we have other evidence but if it were me, I would definitely push back and state that you suspect the failure was caused by overloading. You may not have a choice other then to say, we will take core of this one but if it happens again, you won't cover it. Just make sure you put that in writing on the customer's receipt.

Hopefully this helps. Thanks
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Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 AT 10:12 AM (Merged)
Tiny
AB AUTOMOTIVEREPAIR TRANSMISSIONS
  • MEMBER
Thanks, my boss knows all that stuff you described, but I as the office manager wanted to learn so you've been a wonderful help. Thank you very much for you time.
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Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 AT 10:12 AM (Merged)
Tiny
KASEKENNY1
  • EXPERT
Sounds great. Glad to help. Thanks for coming back to 2CarPros. Talk to you next time.
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Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 AT 10:12 AM (Merged)
Tiny
SHAWNBOY31
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 FORD F-150
  • 5.4L
  • V8
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 163,000 MILES
I was driving down the road, and slowed down to make a right turn but I only had to yield not stop so I was rolling about 20-25 mph. I yielded and turned right, went to push on gas so truck would speed up and when I did so the engine just revved up. The truck rolled to a stop but was still running, never made a noise, no smell, no leaks, no indicator lights, nothing, never slipped, or jerked or anything. You can put truck in park and it starts up fine, shift down to reverse, the truck backs up just like normal, shift down to neutral, the RPM kinda raise like it's in neutral, shift to drive, 2nd, or 1st and the truck does not even try to roll forward, it just revs up. What could be going on? Please help me.
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Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 AT 10:14 AM (Merged)
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
  • EXPERT
Hi,

Based on your description, it sounds like either the forward clutch drum is cracked or the seals have failed. I am leaning toward the clutch drum since you have no forward gears at all. Usually, a seal will still retain some pressure.

I attached a pic below of the parts I am referring to. I highlighted the seals and the clutch drum. It is the last pic in the list.

The only way to truly check this is to take the transmission apart. I don't know how comfortable you are with that. However, I am going to provide the directions for the forward clutch assembly rebuilding.

Vehicle Transmission and Drive-train Automatic Transmission/Trans-axle Service and Repair Procedures Automatic Transmission - 4R100 Disassembly and Assembly of Sub-assemblies Forward Clutch Assembly
FORWARD CLUTCH ASSEMBLY
Forward Clutch Assembly

Forward Clutch Assembly, Disassembled View
Disassembly

1. Remove the No. 9A forward clutch thrust bearing.

2. Remove the No. 8B forward clutch needle bearing assembly.

3. Remove the 2 interlocking cast iron forward clutch cylinder seals.

4. Remove the selective forward clutch pressure plate retaining ring.

5. NOTE: Tag the parts for identification during installation.

Remove the forward clutch pressure plates.
1 Remove the top forward clutch pressure plate.
2 Remove the clutch plates.
3 Remove the forward clutch pressure spring.
4 Remove the bottom forward clutch pressure plate.

6. Remove the forward clutch piston return spring retaining ring.

7. Remove the forward clutch piston return spring.

8. Remove the forward clutch piston apply ring.

9. Using compressed air, remove the forward clutch piston.

10. Remove the outer forward clutch piston seal.

11. Using the special tool, remove the forward clutch piston inner seal.
12. Inspect the clutch cylinder thrust surfaces, piston bore, and clutch plate splines for scores, burrs or wear. Install a new clutch cylinder if it is badly scored or damaged.
13. Check the fluid passage in the clutch cylinder for obstructions. Clean out all fluid passages. Inspect clutch piston for scores and install new, if necessary. Inspect the check balls for freedom of movement.
14. Check the clutch release spring for distortion and cracks. Install a new spring if it is distorted or cracked.
15. Inspect the friction clutch plates, steel clutch plates, and clutch pressure plate for worn or scored surfaces. Install new parts that are scored, buffed or burnt.
16. Check the clutch plates for flatness and wear on the clutch hub splines. Discard any plate that does not slide freely on the splines or that is not flat.
17. Check the clutch hub thrust surfaces for scores and the clutch hub splines for wear. Install new parts that are worn.

Assembly

NOTE: Soak the clutch plates for 15 minutes in clean automatic transmission fluid.

1. Install the forward clutch piston inner seal.

2. Inspect the forward clutch piston check ball.
- Check for freedom of movement and correct seating.
- Clean with a suitable solvent, if necessary.
- Replace the forward clutch piston assembly, if necessary.

3. NOTE: Make sure the seal lip is facing upward.

Install the forward clutch piston outer seal.

4. Using the special tool, install the forward clutch piston.

5. Install the steel forward clutch piston apply ring into the forward clutch piston groove.

6. CAUTION: To ensure durability, the notch between the spring filters must be positioned so that both ends of the forward clutch piston apply ring are visible.

Install the forward clutch piston return spring.
1 Install the forward clutch piston return spring, with the spring fingers against the forward clutch piston apply ring.
2 Make sure the notch is positioned so that both ends of the forward clutch piston apply ring are visible.

7. Install the forward clutch piston return spring retaining ring. Make sure it is correctly seated in the groove.

8. NOTE: Soak the clutch plates for 15 minutes in clean automatic transmission fluid.

Install the forward clutch pressure plates.
1 Install the bottom forward clutch pressure plate.
2 Install the forward clutch pressure spring.
3 Install the forward clutch pressure plates.
4 Install the top forward clutch pressure plate.

9. Install the selective forward clutch pressure plate retaining ring.

10. Check the stack-up clearance.
- Using a feeler gauge, check the stack-up clearance in three places, 120 degrees apart.
- If the clearance is not to specification, install the correct selective forward clutch pressure plate retaining ring and recheck the clearance.

11. NOTE: Lightly lubricate the needle bearing with petroleum jelly to hold it in place during assembly.

NOTE: The bearing large inner diameter radius must face inward.

Install the No. 8B forward clutch needle bearing.

12. NOTE: Stagger the interlocking opening on the seals 180 degrees apart.

Install the two new cast iron forward clutch cylinder seals in the grooves.

13. NOTE: Lightly lubricate the thrust bearing with petroleum jelly to hold it in place during assembly.

NOTE: The black side of the bearing must face upward.

Install the No. 9A forward clutch thrust bearing.

Check out the diagrams (Below). Please let us know if you need anything else to get the problem fixed.
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Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 AT 10:14 AM (Merged)
Tiny
STARCITY
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 FORD F-150
  • 4.6L
  • V8
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 180,000 MILES
I am in the process of rebuilding a 4r70w transmission and during the tear down I found one item missing from what I can tell from the 4r70w schematic. The two to three accumulator assembly was missing the snap ring. I have read from other forums that some have it and some do not. The schematic shows it. Can you please give me an answer on this one as to if its needed or not. Also was the snap ring on the two to three accum assemb part of the 4r70w failure as to your knowledge. Thanks in advance. If the snap ring is needed do you have a number or a link to purchase one?
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Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 AT 10:15 AM (Merged)
Tiny
HMAC300
  • EXPERT
Any transmission supply place should have it or a transmission shop for that matter. In picture is retainer or snap ring. If it was not there it would be awful hard to put valve body in proper position, but I am not a Ford specialist on transmissions and questions like this should be left to a transmission shop they will tell you one way or another. It may have been left out on purpose as well. Over time some things are not needed and tossed or just not put in. See picture.
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Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 AT 10:15 AM (Merged)
Tiny
SCOTSAIL
  • MEMBER
  • 1997 FORD F-150
  • 4.6L
  • V8
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 175,000 MILES
My truck needs a transmission rebuild.
I was told when I bought the truck that the transmission was replaced with a recovered transmission.
I need to buy a rebuild kit, but how am I to know what transmission kit to get? Looking at kits, it appears there are two types of transmissions that were OEM (4R70W and E4OD). But is there any chance that the transmission that was recovered could be anything different? Meaning, do only those two fit in the truck, or could others (maybe different brands) of transmissions also fit. Meaning I would be dealing with something totally different.
I have attached a picture I took from the tag on the housing. I do not know how to read it and cannot find anything on internet searching to break it out either.
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Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 AT 12:53 PM (Merged)
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
There is a trans code letter on the sticker that is on the drivers door. A code U is the 4R70W (which is the most likely one used for that truck) or a code E which would be the E40D trans)

I would just take it to a transmission shop and let them do the rebuild. That gets you a warranty and they generally know the issues the transmission has and will add better parts in places the OEM ones show weakness. Plus as yours has a different trans than stock they can get the parts to match that exact unit. There are minor changes on that trans over the years, so if they used a transmission from a 98 or up the kit will be different than the one for your model year, even though the transmission has the same model number.
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Wednesday, March 24th, 2021 AT 12:53 PM (Merged)

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