Power drain

Tiny
JIMMY SCOTT
  • MEMBER
  • 1991 CHEVROLET S-10
  • 4.3L
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 102,000 MILES
I apparently hooked up the jumper cables backwards and fried a wire that ran from the hot side to the alternator so I fixed that and I still have a draw still. I cannot find anything else that would be ruined. I found that my door locks would not work so, I unplugged that and I still have a draw.
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Friday, January 20th, 2017 AT 3:21 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
CJ MEDEVAC
  • EXPERT
The wire you fried, was it a fusible link? If so, did you replace it with one?

Draw was before the Mr. Jumper Cable issue?

The jumpers were used because the battery had been drawn down?

How are you testing for the draw?

Results?

Add any other historical stuff that might play into this problem.

The Medic
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Friday, January 20th, 2017 AT 3:35 PM
Tiny
AL514
  • EXPERT
How are you checking for the draw? Are you using a meter inline with one of the battery cables or just having a dead battery? A quick way to check also is to put a test light inline on the negative battery cable. It will light up with a draw because there is current flow, then start unplugging fuses until the test light goes out. This will tell you which circuit is drawing current.
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Friday, January 20th, 2017 AT 3:36 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
Using a test light is an old school method that is not something that should be used on today's vehicles.
All current day vehicles have some degree of intentional drain and the test light is not sensitive enough to determine what is acceptable and what is not.

This is the proper way to measure the draw.

You will need a digital ammeter and a jumper wire with clips on the ends to do this.
First rig any door switches so you can have a door open without triggering the interior lights and unplug the hood light. Remove one battery cable and attach the meter in series between the battery cable and battery post. Take the jumper wire and also attach it the same way. Leave the jumper wire on for at least thirty to forty minutes to expire all the automatic timers. Now remove the jumper wire and read the meter. Anything over 50 ma is too much draw. The way you locate this is to start removing fuses one at a time until the meter drops to normal level. This will be the circuit with something staying on. Determine what components are part of that circuit and check them individually until the problem is isolated.
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Friday, January 20th, 2017 AT 4:43 PM

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