Code: PO 1346 running poorly

Tiny
6GUNN
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 TOYOTA SIENNA
  • 3.0L
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 203,000 MILES
My wife's van is setting the following codes:PO 300,301,303,305,1346. She was driving the van on the freeway last fall and it started to buck and stumble.
I parked the van for the winter, and just now restated it to pull into the barn to work on, and it is running okay now. I was thinking that the timing belt had jumped a tooth, but it seems strange that it would run smooth now. It was hard to get the van to start.
I appreciate any help you can give me.
John
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Sunday, March 5th, 2017 AT 8:17 AM

3 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
This engine has variable valve timing, so it can look like the timing has jumped. They usually use an advance mechanism that operates on pressurized engine oil. Logic would suggest they can stick.

Code P01346 refers to "variable valve timing sensor circuit range/performance (bank 1)". That code could be caused by a defective sensor, but it is just as likely to be caused by a wiring or connector terminal problem.

Code P0300 refers to a random cylinder misfire. The others refer to specific cylinder misfires. The last digit indicates which cylinders. With so many misfire codes, I would start with new spark plugs. If you keep getting misfire codes for the same cylinders, swap the ignition coils from those cylinders with those that are not setting codes. Erase the fault codes, then see if misfire codes set for the same cylinders or the ones you moved the suspect coils to.
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Sunday, March 5th, 2017 AT 4:23 PM
Tiny
6GUNN
  • MEMBER
The plugs may have 10-15K on them, so not a lot of miles on them. I had to pull the intake off to replace the anti knock sensors, so I replaced the plugs at that time. I didn't replace the gasket for the intake, just used the old one. Any chance that a leaking intake gasket could be behind the problem?
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Monday, March 6th, 2017 AT 11:52 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I don't think so. If you have a vacuum leak, you're still going to get fuel from the injector, unlike with a carburetor. The oxygen sensor would detect a lean condition, but that shouldn't cause a misfire that you would feel. It might cause a misfire that only the Engine Computer could detect.

The best way to check this is with a smoke machine. You might find one at an auto parts store that rents or borrows tools. Inject the smoke into a vacuum hose port on the intake manifold. If the gaskets are leaking, you'll see the smoke sneaking out.
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Tuesday, March 7th, 2017 AT 9:59 AM

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