1996 Oldsmobile 88 96 olds engine swap, passkey problems?

Tiny
BUNTA
  • MEMBER
  • 1996 OLDSMOBILE 88
Computer problem
1996 Oldsmobile 88 6 cyl Front Wheel Drive Automatic 100k + miles

Hey guys. Here is the story.

The '96 Olds 88 had the L36 3.8l v6. It spun a rod bearing, so I snatched the supercharged L67 3.8l v6 from a 1996 Buick Riviera.

I re-used the olds harness (Only a couple minor modifications, and I am federally licensed aircraft mechanic.A.K.A. I promise my wiring is correct).

I swapped the engine, transmission, passenger side axle, and PCM. I also took the keys from the Buick.

Everything is installed, according to the pinouts I found on a Fiero forum the PCM's for the 2 cars are supposedly identical (So no re-pinning necessary. Supposedly).

At the moment it cranks but won't start. It's getting spark, there is fuel in the rail, however the injectors aren't firing, and it will hit and run for a second on started fluid.

This leads me to believe it's the passkey system.
What I did was got a new key made which fits the Oldsmobile lock cylinder, but with the resistor pellet matching the Buick. In my theory, this should allow the lock to turn, and also send the correct signal to the Buick PCM. (PLEASE correct me if I'm wrong on ANY of this)

I found the generic re-learn online somewhere (Start, key to run for 10 min, security light goes off, repeat 2 times) BUT my security light doesn't go off after 10 minutes or after 2 hours.

I guess (So long as the rest of my story sounds right) my question is this:
Is the re-learn the same for the '96 olds 88 and the '96 Buick Riviera?

And if it is the same, why won't the security light go off so I can do it?

I'd also LOVE to see the PCM pinouts of both cars so I could make sure (The pinouts I found were labeled as "1996 PCM's L36 and L67" as if they were 100% identical, but I wonder if the Buick might have an extra wire I need to add or change.
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Saturday, May 16th, 2009 AT 4:31 PM

2 Replies

Tiny
PEAR69
  • MEMBER
The re-learn procedure you describe is a temporary by-pass procedure that is done to start the engine in the event that the passkey (passlock) system resistor or module, fails or is failing. A re-learning procedure is done to the computer and passkey (passlock) module at a GM Dealership. It requires the use of the GM Tech 1 or 2 Scan Tool. Your VIN and cranking resistance is reprogramed into the computer. Your problem sounds like the passkey (passlock) system, but ther repair or re-learning of this system must be done at a dealer.
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Tuesday, May 19th, 2009 AT 9:56 PM
Tiny
BUNTA
  • MEMBER
I finally figured it out.

As with everything, if the stealership can do it for 150 bucks, I can do it for 30, and sure enough, I did :D

Basically I had the right Idea from the start, My new key I had cut matches the resistance from my donor car, and for my L67 PCM, but NOT for my original VATS module.

Every VATS module is set to work with ONE resistance, so it only works for the original key.

I had to get a VATS module that matched my new key and my new PCM and Blammo, we're back in business.

So, for future reference, in case others see this post, and since this information is truly not available online:

If you pull the engine/transmission/passenger side axle/PCM/harness etc. From a donor to do a complete swap, you also MUST get the VATS module from under the dash, UNLESS your donor has the same resistance as your stock VATS module.

If you don't, you only have a couple options:
1. Get overcharged by the dealer to do a simple re-learn, and take the chance that Jo-Bob GM tech reflashes your L67 PCM back to an L36, since they will want to use your VIN number, and GM techs are not, on average, very skilled or knowledgeable about engine swaps/performance stuff in general.

2. Buy an aftermarket PCM, such as the INTENSE PCM, which can be custom ordered to your specs and eliminates the VATS. This will cost upwards of 300 bucks, and afterwards you don't have ANY anti-theft.

I would like to think simply pulling the correct VATS module for 20 bucks at the junkyard is the easiest, cheapest way to do this, and when you are done you still have the factory anti-theft system.
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Monday, June 15th, 2009 AT 2:56 PM

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