Not sure exactly what I am lookin at under there!

Tiny
KATIE_IS_REBEL
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 FORD THUNDERBIRD
  • 4.6L
  • V8
  • RWD
  • AUTOMATIC
Ok, I am a DIY-re without a lot of experience I guess. I know more than most females and am less afraid of getting dirty than most guys! I am not completely dumb, but I also am only self taught so get confused sometimes due to the limit in my knowledge. Ok with that said. I am trying to do an oil change on my 1995 ford thunderbird which I haven't had for very long. I have done oil changes before, but for some reason I am rather confused once I get underneath this beast! Is there anyone who can explain to me what I am looking at and where exactly from the point of view of laying underneath the car? Like which pan is the oil pan? (I think it's the 1st one closest to the front with a plug facing the drivers side? And the one directly behind it is the transmission pan which has a funny looking thing on it that to me resembles an "o-ring" type seal which is facing the passengers side?) Next, I am pretty sure I figured out where the oil filter is located, but am not 100% sure because it's hard to see from above AND underneath and would hate to make that sort of mistake! Haha I know I must sound really dumb, but like I said this car is new to me and I just don't want to make any costly mistakes. I have searched online trying to find these Answers for far too long already and so I am swallowing my pride and asking for help.
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Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015 AT 1:19 PM

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Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Any chance you can post a few photos of the underneath?

You might actually have two drain plugs for engine oil. Ford did that quite often because there needed to be a hump in the middle of the pan for the steering linkage to pass under. You need to remove both plugs, (not necessarily at the same time), to drain all the old oil.

The oil pan is usually about six to eight inches high and will be closest to the front of the car. The transmission pan is only two or three inches high and most of the time won't have a drain plug.

There's no pride to be swallowed. There's a real lot of guys out there who have no clue how the machine they trust to get them back home works. In nine years of teaching at a community college, I had five girls. Two were almost as useless as a few of the guys. You had to get out of the way of one or she would run you over with enthusiasm. The last two were two of my top students. The guys had a lot of respect for them. You might consider looking into the program at a nearby technical college, or ask if they have night classes for people in the community. With those non-credit classes, you get use of the facilities, there's no homework or studying, and there's an instructor always there to answer questions. You can also look for text books in the school's library.

If you're interested in pursuing some subjects further, I have some outdated text books available for the cost of postage. To keep the program certification, we can't use any text books that are more than five years old. The information in the old ones is still relevant though. There are a lot of videos and articles on this site too. If you want to get into electrical, you can send me a private message, then I'll send you to my web site. It was designed for Automotive students already in a class, but I'm in the process of adding pages for basic electrical theory for people who have no training at all. Next I'll be adding sections for Suspension and Alignment, then Brakes.
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Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015 AT 8:35 PM
Tiny
KATIE_IS_REBEL
  • MEMBER
Thank you for your time and helpful info. I took some pics. They were taken from the angle of me crawling under the car under front fender head first and holding my phone above my head. I hope they are clear enough to be seen properly. And I just might be interested in the books and stuff u mentioned but I have no clue how to send u a message from here cause I am very new to this site as of rt now. But when I have the chance to try and figure it out, u will b hearing from me. Unless of course u would want to message me first? Lol Thank you again for the help. I appreciate it very much
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Wednesday, June 3rd, 2015 AT 9:06 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
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I can't send a private message to you. I think we lost the ability to do that a couple of years ago. You might be able to reach me though. Look for "caradiodoc" at the top of the page and click on that.

The photos didn't show up. I found that anything I want to post, I paste into an MS Word document where I can alter it and add arrows and captions, then I copy it, then paste it into MS Paint. There I can save it as a jpeg file. I give it a name I'll recognize when I click on "Add Image" and "Browse".
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Thursday, June 4th, 2015 AT 7:29 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
The photos still aren't showing up. I think a better solution is to just call someone over to peek underneath and point out the oil filter, or find what you think is the filter, write down the name brand and part number, then go to an auto parts store and have them cross-reference that number. If you found the oil filter, the numbers will be listed in their books as such. They may also have a diagram showing where every filter is on your engine. In the '70s and '80s most Ford oil filters were on the passenger side, (as I recall), and they hung straight down, meaning little oil ran down your arm when you unscrewed it. I also can picture the filter near the left front of the engine, but I'm not familiar with your engine.

You can also just go and buy a new oil filter, then look underneath for what looks like it. There won't be anything else that looks similar. The oil filter will always be screwed to the engine block, or to an aluminum "adapter" that is bolted to the engine block.
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Monday, June 8th, 2015 AT 11:22 PM

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