Starter Relay location needed

Tiny
NVARGAS13
  • MEMBER
  • 2013 NISSAN ALTIMA
  • 2.5L
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 115,000 MILES
Bought a brand new starter for my car listed above, installed it and car turned on and ran perfectly. Drove a few miles and parked for a few hours and car would not start. Came back next morning and tried jumping the battery, uninstalled and tested the starter, but still no crank- just one click when pressing push start. It seems the starter is not communicating with the car, so my next guess was the starter relay. I checked all of the fuse boxes, read manual and searched the web and cannot find its location. Does any one know where the starter relay is located on the the car listed above S Sedan? Or maybe any suggestions on what the issue could be? Many thanks.
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Sunday, October 18th, 2020 AT 1:40 PM

6 Replies

Tiny
KASEKENNY1
  • EXPERT
You could be correct but we need to rule out a possible starter. I assume when you removed the starter and you tested it, did you just put 12 volts to it and see if it engaged? If so, this is unfortunately not sufficient. We need to test the voltage at the starter when you are cranking the engine. You should have 12 volts on both wires. If you do then the starter is not able to engage the engine.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/starter-not-working-repair

I attached the info on this and the info on the starter relay. You have 2 relays but they are part of the IPDM. However, if you have voltage at both wires on the starter when cranking the engine then the relays are fine.

Let me know what you find and we can go from there. Thanks
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Sunday, October 18th, 2020 AT 2:16 PM
Tiny
NVARGAS13
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I used the car battery to test the starter to make sure it was working properly. I will test the starter with a multimeter tomorrow and see what kind of read I get. The starter relay part is confusing. The part is sold separately at AutoZone, but even when opened, the IPDM doesn t seem to have a slot for it that s accessible due to the soldered circuit board. But I will test it property like you mentioned and take it from there. Thanks for the help.
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Sunday, October 18th, 2020 AT 5:33 PM
Tiny
KASEKENNY1
  • EXPERT
Okay. Sounds good. Take a look at that last attachment and notice how it says that the relays are "integrated" into the IPDM which means it is not serviced separate. More then likely the parts store is just finding a listing for a relay but as you have found there is no place to install it.

This was pretty common on most vehicles of this age. Most of them back then were using these types of control boxes. Chrysler uses a TIPM and Ford used a Smart Junction Box. All similar.

Let's just check voltage as you said on both terminals when starting the vehicle. You should have 12 volts all the time on the wire from the battery. The control wire should only have 12 volts when starting the vehicle.
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Sunday, October 18th, 2020 AT 6:44 PM
Tiny
NVARGAS13
  • MEMBER
Thank you for clearing up the relay confusion. That makes sense. So I performed the tests using a multimeter this time. The battery gave me a reading of 12.25 volts. I then tested the larger node on the starter while cranking and gave me the same reading. The smaller node gave a spark and fluctuated between 5 to 17 volts during cranking. It didn t give me a steady reading. I also detached connectors from the starter and tested the ends. Again the large one matched the battery voltage and the smaller one fluctuated in the same range as before. Thanks again.
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Monday, October 19th, 2020 AT 2:07 PM
Tiny
NVARGAS13
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I forgot to mention that the car would not start. I m going to order a new starter and see how that works.
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Tuesday, October 20th, 2020 AT 9:14 AM
Tiny
KASEKENNY1
  • EXPERT
Okay. It could be a starter but that fluctuation is not right. While waiting for the starter, can you do two tests? Let's start with a voltage drop on that wire. You do that by putting one lead of your meter on the stud at the starter and the other lead on the wire where it comes out of the IPDM and then crank the engine. This is going to test the amount of voltage the wire is using.

Then unhook the connectors at both ends and measure the resistance/ohms on that wire. It should be less then a half ohm.
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Tuesday, October 20th, 2020 AT 8:41 PM

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