Timing chain/belt replacement

Tiny
DF2014
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 NISSAN 240SX
First, does this car have a timing belt, or timing chain? What exactly is the difference? Also, how often does the timing chain/belt need to be changed? I have read varying information, some suggesting that it needs to be changed at 100,000 miles, some say at 200,000 miles, and some say it does not to be changed at all. But if it breaks, I know its much more expensive to repair a ruined engine.
The car is currently at 114,500 miles. Timing chain?
Thank you
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Monday, January 16th, 2006 AT 1:49 PM

9 Replies

Tiny
DAEMON240SX
  • MEMBER
The 1995 200 SX has a timing chain. Here are diagrams below to show you how to do the job and the timing chain alignment marks. Check out the diagrams (below). Please let us know if you need anything else to get the problem fixed.

The 1995-1999 Sentra and 200SX (b14) either have a 1.6l or a 2.0 liter engine in them. Both have a timing chain. Engine noise: The timing-chain tension-er guide tends to break and the chain becomes very noisy. (1995)

I would replace it every 60,000 to 100,000 miles. Depending on how rough you drive it
If you hear a rattle coming from the timing chain area you should probably replace it.

Cheers
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Sunday, January 29th, 2006 AT 6:29 PM
Tiny
TIGMAT
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 NISSAN 240SX
Four cylinder automatic 87,600 miles.

Hi! As I understand, my 1998 240SX SE has both plastic and metal timing chain guides. When getting a leak repaired, a 1 1/2" piece of plastic was found in my oil pan and I was told it was a timing chain guide and that they did not know how much longer my car had, but they could fix for $2,400.00. Well after checking the internet, I find that the 240SX have a well-document problem with their plastic guides breaking, but that on my model, I should also have a metal guide and that I can have whatever is left of the plastic guide removed will no ill-effect. I plan to have this done. My question is, I am hoping that this plastic guide is located under the valve cover gasket when removed? Also, I can email a picture of the part since I have it in my possession! I thank you for your speedy reply to help put my mind at ease!


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/260441_Broken_timing_guide_1.jpg

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Wednesday, August 29th, 2018 AT 10:06 AM (Merged)
Tiny
ROLLINJ30
  • MEMBER
First off it is not very hard to change these guides yourself. It is definitely not worth $2,400.00. It is not located under the valve cover. You have to take off all the front covers including your water pump etc. I believe that the guide you broke is the lower guide. You have two timing chains, two guides, and two tension-er's. Be sure not to bend the oil pan because the front cover has a scoop that goes into the oil pan so do not be alarmed when you cannot take the front cover all the way off you have to work with what room you have. But if you just do not care about the money then having someone do it is probably your best bet.
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Wednesday, August 29th, 2018 AT 10:06 AM (Merged)
Tiny
TIGMAT
  • MEMBER
Hi Rollinj30! I thank you for your advice! After much checking with auto shops and on the internet, I think I have decided to "wing" it and just drive the car since everyone/where I have checked says it should be making some kind of noise, which it is not. I was worried that the car might jump timing with it broken, but was told that unless I revved the engine unusually high, it should be just fine (still have tension-er arm in place) with the short distances I drive it. The auto shops I spoke with all said, "while we're in there, we might as well change out all the parts in the area", hence the high amounts. But, if you think I am driving a ticking time-bomb, please let me know!
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Wednesday, August 29th, 2018 AT 10:06 AM (Merged)
Tiny
ROLLINJ30
  • MEMBER
With half of a guide, yes I would say so. I mean it may not be a problem for a while, but it is definite that there will be a problem. If I was looking at the picture right it looks like it broke at the pivot point which is a major part well because that is where it mainly bolts up. If the rest is in there just chilling then jumping timing will be a very real instance. But your pension-er's should hold it in place just pray they do not decide to lock up on you. They tend to do that at about 100,000 miles or so.
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Wednesday, August 29th, 2018 AT 10:06 AM (Merged)
Tiny
QURANWOMACK129
  • MEMBER
  • 1991 NISSAN 240SX
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 20,000 MILES
How much would it cost to put in a timing chain?
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Wednesday, August 29th, 2018 AT 10:06 AM (Merged)
Tiny
DOCFIXIT
  • EXPERT
If head is not pulled at nine hours plus parts, chain and guide at $180.00. So if your area labor rate is $90 an hour. Then it is $1,000.00.
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Wednesday, August 29th, 2018 AT 10:06 AM (Merged)
Tiny
MEDINAFX
  • MEMBER
  • 1991 NISSAN 240SXNISSAN 240SX
I have a 1989 Nissan 240SX with the single cam engine. When I got it when I turned it on I would hear like a tapping sound coming from the cams and then it would go away. But, now the sounds does not go away and the faster I go the more the tapping continues.
Can someone help me? Thanks
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Wednesday, August 29th, 2018 AT 10:06 AM (Merged)
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
Try doing an engine flush and use the correct grade oil might work. If not time to remove valve cover and investigate the lifters/camshaft.
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Wednesday, August 29th, 2018 AT 10:06 AM (Merged)

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