1998 Mazda Protege Oil breather filter

Tiny
CAVALIER96
  • MEMBER
  • 1998 MAZDA PROTEGE
Engine Performance problem
1998 Mazda Protege 4 cyl Front Wheel Drive Manual 257K miles

I just bought 1998 Mazda Protege LX 4 cylinder, 1.5L. And I'm looking to boost the engines performance. I recently bought a small Spectre filter from Autozone that I think is an oil breather filter of sorts. I'm unsure how to install it.

Can someone explain how this filter is installed? I think it belongs to the crankcase somehow but I could be wrong. Step-by-step instructions would be great!

Thank you.

David
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Monday, November 30th, 2009 AT 6:58 PM

7 Replies

Tiny
MHPAUTOS
  • EXPERT
HI there,

I have no idea as to what this filter is, can you give me a web page and part No so I can see what it looks like, that may help.

Mark
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Monday, November 30th, 2009 AT 7:07 PM
Tiny
CAVALIER96
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The part number is: 3996. Go to www. Autozone. Com and type that number into the "Product Search". It will bring up a page with three categories. Go to "Accessories" and click on "Breather Filter" right next to the picture of a filter. It will bring you to an exact match of what I bought.

I bought it mainly because of it's affordability and neat look, but I'm having a harder time then I thought figuring out how to install it.

David
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Tuesday, December 1st, 2009 AT 7:27 AM
Tiny
MHPAUTOS
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HI there,

This looks like an oil filler breather, this will not be compatible with your engine, I would be sending it back.

Mark (mhpautos)
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Tuesday, December 1st, 2009 AT 4:25 PM
Tiny
CAVALIER96
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What exactly is an oil breather filter and where does it go? I was thinking it was a crankcase filter of sorts.

I want to know where it would go on another engine if I can't use it on mine. I thought maybe you would detach the PCV hose from the crankcase that leads to the air intake and then tighten the filter onto the nipple that protrudes from the crankcase and plug the hole on the air intake.

What's wrong with this thinking? Haha

David
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Tuesday, December 1st, 2009 AT 8:47 PM
Tiny
MHPAUTOS
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Hi there,

Your engine is designed to run the PCV valve this is a requirement by law, in days before pollution requirements, engine were open breathing engines, and some oil fillers has this type of filter, you just cant take of the PCV valve and stick on a fancy filter the system just does not work that way, see text for info on the PCV system

Mark (mhpautos)

PCV system
The PCV valve is only one part of the PCV system, which is essentially a variable and calibrated air leak, whereby the engine returns its crankcase combustion gases. Instead of the gases being vented to the atmosphere, gases are fed back into the intake manifold, to re-enter the combustion chamber as part of a fresh charge of air and fuel. The PCV system is not a classical "vacuum leak." All the air collected by the air cleaner (and metered by the mass air flow sensor, on a fuel injected engine) goes through the intake manifold. The PCV system just diverts a small percentage of this air via the breather to the crankcase before allowing it to be drawn back in to the intake tract again. It is an "open system" in that fresh exterior air is continuously used to flush contaminants from the crankcase and into the combustion chamber.

The system relies on the fact that, while the engine is running, the intake manifold's air pressure is always less than crankcase air pressure. The lower pressure of the intake manifold draws air towards it, pulling air from the breather through the crankcase (where it dilutes and mixes with combustion gases), through the PCV valve, and into the intake manifold.

The PCV system consists of the breather tube and the PCV valve. The breather tube connects the crankcase to a clean source of fresh air, such as the air cleaner body. Usually, clean air from the air cleaner flows in to this tube and in to the engine after passing through a screen, baffle, or other simple system to arrest a flame front, to prevent a potentially explosive atmosphere within the engine crank case from being ignited from a back-fire in to the intake manifold. The baffle, filter, or screen also traps oil mist, and keeps it inside the engine.

Once inside the engine, the air circulates around the interior of the engine, picking up and clearing away combustion byproduct gases, including a large amount of water vapor, then exits through a simple baffle, screen or mesh to trap oil droplets before being drawn out through the PCV valve, and into the intake manifold
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Tuesday, December 1st, 2009 AT 9:27 PM
Tiny
CAVALIER96
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I wasn't going to stick on a filter without asking questions first. The PCV valve is staying intact.

Are you saying these filters are created for illegal purposes or that they were designed for "open breathing" engines back before pollution requirements took effect?

What would be an example of an engine that would legally benefit from these breather filters?

Thanks,

David
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Wednesday, December 2nd, 2009 AT 8:05 AM
Tiny
MHPAUTOS
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No automotive engines built after the introduction of these pollution laws can use them, these will be ok on most cars say pre mid 70's or there abouts

Mark
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Wednesday, December 2nd, 2009 AT 3:23 PM

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