2000 Hyundai Accent TIMING BELT

Tiny
KEGGERS76
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 HYUNDAI ACCENT
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • MANUAL
  • 110,000 MILES
I HAVE A 2000 ACCENT WITH THE 1.5 SOHC ENGINE.
THE TIMING BELT (SERPENTINE) BROKE AS I WAS DRIVING. I AM TOLD THAT THE MOTOR IS NOW BAD. IS THAT TRUE?
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Monday, October 18th, 2010 AT 7:38 PM

1 Reply

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Hi Keggers76. Welcome to the forum. Many engines today are what is referred to as "interference engines" meaning the piston and the valves occupy the same space but not at the same time. When the timing belt breaks, the valve train stops almost instantly but the pistons take a while to coast to a stop. Some of the valves are open when they stop moving and the coasting pistons bang into them and bend them. It is very possible some of the valves will survive without being hit but some of the valves will definitely be bent.

Bent valves doesn't mean the engine is junk but it means "get out your wallet". You will need a valve job which is not such a terrible thing at 110,000 miles. This will typical run around $500.00 to, ... Oh, ... About $800.00 including the new timing belt.

I personally will never own any car with an interference engine. I drive only older Chrysler products but every manufacturer has at least a few engines of that design. My '88 Grand Caravan has 379,000 miles and the timing belt was only replaced once when the water pump went out but that is not an interference engine, so if it were to break, no serious damage would occur except to my shoes as I walk home! :) That is fairly uncommon though. To put things in perspective, Hondas from the 1980s recommended the timing belt be replaced every 75,000 miles, and it was common for them to break at 65,000 miles! Most engines will go longer than that but I suspect if you can find it in the owner's manual, it is probably recommended to replace your belt at or before 100,000 miles.

If your engine is not an interference design, all you will need is a new timing belt. Many engines, such as mine, run the water pump with the timing belt and most shops will want to replace it too for insurance and since they're already in there. Replacing each part by itself is a big job so might as well do both right away. Some manufacturers also recommend replacing the part that maintains the proper tension on the belt. It's smart to do that right away too to prevent future problems.

Even if you need a valve job, this is no reason to scrap the car. The cost of repair is equivalent to two or three monthly car payments if you buy something new, and a used car could develop the same problem. If you like your car, fix it. If you don't like it, you'll get almost the same value for a trade-in even if you don't have it repaired first.

One final thought: In rare instances one or more pistons could be cracked when the timing belt fails and they hit the open valves. There is no easy way to tell until the cylinder head is removed. At that point the repair estimate will go way up, but keep in mind a used engine from the salvage yard could develop the same problem. A total engine rebuild may be required at that point.

Caradiodoc
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Monday, October 18th, 2010 AT 10:30 PM

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