Timing belt replacement

Tiny
HILTONN
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  • 10 POSTS
I already put it all back together before I received your last helpful email. The last thing I done before putting the upper and lower covers back on was double checked for the timing marks and the crankshaft at TDC. I rotated the engine before putting all pulleys and belts back on. It cranked beautiful! So am I safe? I'll wait and hear from you before I crank it again! Thanks.
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:20 PM (Merged)
Tiny
KHLOW2008
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Before cranking the engine, you must manually turn the crankshaft at least 2 revolutions and recheck the belt timing. If they all line up, you are safe.

Since you have rotated the crankshaft and rechecked the timing marks, it should be good.

Have a nice day.
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:20 PM (Merged)
Tiny
HILTONN
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Thank you for all your help. I will donate the next time I ask a question. You have been a great help! God bless you and your staff!
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:20 PM (Merged)
Tiny
KHLOW2008
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You're welcome and glad to be of help.

Thank you for using 2carpros.
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:20 PM (Merged)
Tiny
NUBES1
  • MEMBER
  • 1 POST
  • 2003 HYUNDAI ACCENT
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • MANUAL
  • 122,000 MILES
How do you remove the crankshaft pulley?
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:20 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JACOBANDNICKOLAS
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Hi:
I believe there are 4 bolts holding it on. Have you checked for that?
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:20 PM (Merged)
Tiny
SUPERBUYR1
  • MEMBER
  • 6 POSTS
  • 2002 HYUNDAI ACCENT
2002 Hyundai Accent

The dealership told my elderly in-laws that they would have to change the timing belt/chain on their car before it broke, because when it broke it would probably ruin the engine. My father in law is starting radiation treat-ments next week, and this something that is going to be difficult for them to afford if they really don't have to, but of course it is cheaper than replacing the engine. Somebody on here told me that it was not a problem at all with my Saturn, how about the Hyundai? Thanks for your help!
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:21 PM (Merged)
Tiny
KHLOW2008
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Hi superbuyr1,

The timing belt is recommended to be replaced at 60 k miles and being an interference engine, it could damage the engine if it broke.

The mileages was not stated so I am not able to ascertain if the belt is due for replacement. Based on the year, it is due.
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:21 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JAYP53
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  • 1 POST
  • 2002 HYUNDAI ACCENT
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • MANUAL
  • 59,400 MILES
When should the timing belt be changed on a 1.5L 2002 hyundai accent with a 1.5 liter engine and a 5 speed transmission. The car has ac and has 59400 miles. Also, is this the type of engine that will damage the valves if the timing belt should break?
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:21 PM (Merged)
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MECHANIC
  • 75,990 POSTS
Its an interference engine 1.5L and T/Belt replacement due at 60,000 miles-do it now
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:21 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JUSTANOTHERDAY
  • MEMBER
  • 2 POSTS
  • 2001 HYUNDAI ACCENT
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • MANUAL
  • 104,000 MILES
Just wanted to know. My engine was replaced before I bought it. I am not sure if it is a 1.5L or 1.6L is it possible that the previous owner put a 1.6L timing belt on a 1.5L or vice versa by mistake and the car still runs? I have eliminated other possibilities for the most part. Just wanted to know before I go down this path of the timing belt. Car does run a bit sluggish.
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:21 PM (Merged)
Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MECHANIC
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If its starting up with no problem and no engine performance and no noises at the front cover-drive on.
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:21 PM (Merged)
Tiny
RAVALENZUELA
  • MEMBER
  • 3 POSTS
  • 2002 HYUNDAI ACCENT
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • MANUAL
  • 101,000 MILES
SYMPTOMS
For a couple weeks, whenever the clutch was in or the car was otherwise in neutral, there would be an audible and continuous squeak/screech similar to this video from about the 30-35 second mark, but quieter:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBTTlYqWqIc

There would be no such squeaking noise as long as the car was in gear and moving, with the clutch let out. Driving the car for an extended period of time would sometimes cause the noise to go away.

I've been travelling on business and haven't had a chance to check it out from there.

However, last night I drove the car home, and the engine died when the car stopped. Brake and power steering hydraulics also stopped working.

The symptoms (total engine/hydraulic failure after decelerating from highway speeds to a full stop) are almost identical to when my Volvo's serpentine belt broke a couple of years ago. However, the serpentine belt on the Hyundai is intact, appears to be in reasonably good condition, and moves when the starter is turned. The car will not, however, start; it sounds like the starter works but the engine will not turn over.

QUESTION
Could it still be the serpentine belt? If so, how can I check?

Could this be timing belt failure? If so, how can I check?

And what other things could cause these symptoms?

Thanks a lot!
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:21 PM (Merged)
Tiny
KHLOW2008
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Hi ravalenzuela,

Thank you for the donation.

If the noise is anything similar to the one from the video, it definitely is not from the timing belt. Neither would it be from the serpentine belt. It is a bearing noise and since the noise only occurs when the clutch is depressed, I would suspect the clutch throwout bearing to be the culprit.

When the bearing seizes, depressing the clutch would cause the engine to stall at low speeds. As the clutch is required to be depressed when cranking, the seized bearing is putting additional load on the crankshaft preventing the sterter from turning.

Unplug the clutch pedal switch and use a jumper across the connector. Without depressing the clutch and with gear in neutral, try starting.

To check if the engine is seized due to a faulty timing belt, manually turn the crankshaft pulley with the aid of a spanner.

Another way to test if the engine is seized is to jack one side of the front tire off the ground. Engage 3rd or 4th gear and turn the wheel that is off the ground by hand. If you are able to turn the wheel, with a little resistance, the engine is ok.

To check the condition of the serpentine belt, see if the belt is intact and all the pullies are lined up. Removing the belt to test all the components would anable yout to check if any comonent is seized.

To check the timing belt, you need to remove the upper cover and turn the engine to verify the camshaft is turning when the engine is being turned.
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:21 PM (Merged)
Tiny
RAVALENZUELA
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Great advice, exactly right. Thank you so much!
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:21 PM (Merged)
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • MECHANIC
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You're welcome but I am curious which part is the correct one? The seized clutch throwout bearing?
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:21 PM (Merged)
Tiny
RAVALENZUELA
  • MEMBER
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The clutch throwout bearing does indeed need replacement, but the timing belt was also cracked. Not a cheap repair, but your analysis was spot on.
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:21 PM (Merged)
Tiny
KHLOW2008
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Thank you for the input.

Too bad it is going to cost a lot of money.
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:21 PM (Merged)
Tiny
KEGGERS76
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  • 1 POST
  • 2000 HYUNDAI ACCENT
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • MANUAL
  • 110,000 MILES
I have a 2000 accent with the 1.5 sohc engine.
The timing belt (serpentine) broke as I was driving. I am told that the motor is now bad. Is that true?
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:21 PM (Merged)
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • MECHANIC
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Hi Keggers76. Welcome to the forum. Many engines today are what is referred to as "interference engines" meaning the piston and the valves occupy the same space but not at the same time. When the timing belt breaks, the valve train stops almost instantly but the pistons take a while to coast to a stop. Some of the valves are open when they stop moving and the coasting pistons bang into them and bend them. It is very possible some of the valves will survive without being hit but some of the valves will definitely be bent.

Bent valves doesn't mean the engine is junk but it means "get out your wallet". You will need a valve job which is not such a terrible thing at 110,000 miles. This will typical run around $500.00 to, ... Oh, ... About $800.00 including the new timing belt.

I personally will never own any car with an interference engine. I drive only older Chrysler products but every manufacturer has at least a few engines of that design. My '88 Grand Caravan has 379,000 miles and the timing belt was only replaced once when the water pump went out but that is not an interference engine, so if it were to break, no serious damage would occur except to my shoes as I walk home! :) That is fairly uncommon though. To put things in perspective, Hondas from the 1980s recommended the timing belt be replaced every 75,000 miles, and it was common for them to break at 65,000 miles! Most engines will go longer than that but I suspect if you can find it in the owner's manual, it is probably recommended to replace your belt at or before 100,000 miles.

If your engine is not an interference design, all you will need is a new timing belt. Many engines, such as mine, run the water pump with the timing belt and most shops will want to replace it too for insurance and since they're already in there. Replacing each part by itself is a big job so might as well do both right away. Some manufacturers also recommend replacing the part that maintains the proper tension on the belt. It's smart to do that right away too to prevent future problems.

Even if you need a valve job, this is no reason to scrap the car. The cost of repair is equivalent to two or three monthly car payments if you buy something new, and a used car could develop the same problem. If you like your car, fix it. If you don't like it, you'll get almost the same value for a trade-in even if you don't have it repaired first.

One final thought: In rare instances one or more pistons could be cracked when the timing belt fails and they hit the open valves. There is no easy way to tell until the cylinder head is removed. At that point the repair estimate will go way up, but keep in mind a used engine from the salvage yard could develop the same problem. A total engine rebuild may be required at that point.

Caradiodoc
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Friday, March 29th, 2019 AT 5:21 PM (Merged)

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