Can overheating after replacing water pump&timing belt

Tiny
DEMETRIS
  • MEMBER
  • HONDA CIVIC
Honda civic 2000 DX hatchback. Mileage 101,000. I recently had the timing belt and water pump replaced. Unfortunately the water pump was defective (so I was told by the mechanic) and after I picked up my car from the mechanic the car overheated while I was on the highway. The thermometer went all the way to the top and I did not realize. I only realized when I saw smoke coming out of the hood. I stopped the car, towed it to the mechanic and since then they replaced the radiator, flushed & checked the cooling system (funs, fluid, etc), replaced the thermostat and anything else they thought was necessary. Since then my car is overheating in a random fashion. The thermometer sometimes goes up to 3/4 high while driving (both in the highway going 50-60 mph or in traffic). When it goes so high it usually comes down pretty quickly. Other times it remains above the middle for a while.
I took it back to the same shop several times. However, they could not figure out anything wrong with it. I plan to take it to another shop but I wanted to ask what else might be causing this problem. Before the water pump incident my car was running perfectly. Is it possible that the initial overheating caused motor damage (or any other damage) to the point where it can't be fixed completely?
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Sunday, October 14th, 2007 AT 5:47 PM

4 Replies

Tiny
FISHERMAN
  • MEMBER
Hello !

Well looks to me like you have air in the cooling system.
How to bleed air from cooling system after a flush or repair. Set heater for maximum heat, Fill coolant reservoir to MAX mark with 50/50 water and coolant mixture. Loosen bleed bolt and fill radiator up to base of filler neck. Close bleed bolt when coolant flows out without bubbles. Tighten bleed bolt. With radiator cap removed, start and operate engine to normal operating temperature. Add coolant if necessary and check for leaks

The radiator should end up about full to the top of the chamber, or to the bottom of the cap. And the overflow bottle between MIN and MAX marks.

Keep an eye on the level for a couple days afterwards.

Anyhow ask them to check the compression test on all cylinders to see if the head its not an issue in the overheat problem and also advise them to "purge" the cooling system.

Let us know!
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Monday, October 15th, 2007 AT 8:40 AM
Tiny
DANSCAR
  • MEMBER
Hi Fisherman,

I have heard a few of my friends with Honda that if you change the coolant, you have to bleed it so as not to overheat. I have a 2002 Honda Civic LX 1.7L, where is the coolant bleed bolt for this engine?

Thank you in advance
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Monday, October 15th, 2007 AT 11:48 AM
Tiny
FISHERMAN
  • MEMBER
Hey Dan !

The bleeder valve (if equipped) Usually is on the upper radiator hose outlet on the engine fill the radiator with coolant until you see the water out of the bleed valve without bubbles, then close the valve - fill the overflow bottle and be sure to turn the heater on to hot when it is warming up to get any air out of the heater

Hope it helps!
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Monday, October 15th, 2007 AT 12:51 PM
Tiny
ROBIN LO
  • MEMBER
How to bleed air if there is no bleeding nipples?The car is Honda Fit(JDM model)with L15A engine.
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Tuesday, December 16th, 2014 AT 8:50 PM

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