Fuse blown

Tiny
SERENA333
  • MEMBER
  • 2010 TOYOTA COROLLA
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 1,300,000 MILES
My nephew replaced the alternator and when he was done I got inside and good night shift it out of park. Also, there is no power steering, no power brakes, no taillights, no dash lights, and I cannot roll down the windows. I tried jumping the battery and I was able to get it to start, but when I drove it it was like it was running out of gas.
If this is the fuse could you tell me which one it is likely to be?
I suspect my nephew did not take the battery cables off because he said he got a big jolt shock while working on the car. Checked all the fuses he said they all seem good except for a big fuse inside the engine in the fuse box.
He said I will have to take that to the dealer and have them replace it because it takes special tools. Before I spend money on a tow to get it to the repair shop I would like to have some idea what it is and approximately how much it would cost to fix?
If I have the shop replace that fuse will that fix all the problems? Thanks
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Wednesday, June 28th, 2017 AT 9:52 PM

2 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Special tools should not be needed to replace fuses. Most cars have a really big fuse for the generator's output circuit. Because the high current would overheat standard plug-in terminals, these large ones are bolted into the under-hood fuse box.

You cannot get a shock, or jolt, from a twelve volt electrical system, so I suspect he meant there was a huge spark. That would come from shorting the output circuit to ground with the wrench, and that would blow that large fuse. There can be other circuits tied to that output circuit, so do not panic yet when multiple systems are out.

Also, be aware that due to all of the unnecessary computers the engineers have seen fit to hang on our cars, there is a pretty significant current surge when a disconnected battery is reconnected. That too can blow multiple fuses, but only the smaller ones.

To verify that large fuse is blown, use a test light or voltmeter to measure the voltage on the output stud on the back of the generator. You should find full battery voltage there all the time. If the fuse is blown, you will find zero volts there. You can buy a replacement from any auto parts store, but since this is a real low-failure item, you can get one from a salvage yard too.
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Wednesday, June 28th, 2017 AT 10:17 PM
Tiny
SERENA333
  • MEMBER
Thank you.
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Friday, June 30th, 2017 AT 7:46 AM

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