2000 Taurus DOHC - No Start after Setting Up

Tiny
BLM
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 FORD TAURUS
I have a 2000 Ford Taurus with DOHC engine, 119,000 miles. I replaced a head gasket. With the DOHC engine, you have to tear apart the whole engine to remove the head (oil pan, timing chain cover, etc.) I did this in my spare time, and the whole process took about 3 months. The car will not start. I have checked fuel pressure, the fuel injectors, all spark plugs are firing. The engine cranks a bit slower than usual, even with a new battery.
My guess is that it's hard to start after setting up for 3 months. If this is the case, then is there something I can do to make it easier.
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Monday, September 24th, 2007 AT 6:56 AM

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Tiny
RASMATAZ
  • MEMBER
The problem you're experiencing could be the Valve and Igniton timing is Off. Hope am wrong.

Did you put the engine's the no1 cylinder on its compression stroke TDC before you tear it apart, also did you aligned all the sprockets in accordance with the book before you closed it.

The engine can have spark and fuel but will fail to start if the Valve and Ignition timing is Off. In the event that you're positively sure you have done it right lets start by doing below.

Lets do this 1st-Turn the key to On position, do you hear the pump for a few secs. If so you need to read the actual fuel pressure with a fuel pressure gauge to determine the correct pressure. Once this is done. You need to check whether the injector/s are being energized-if not the computer might not be getting a crank signal from the ignition indicating the engine is not rotating therefore the computer is not activating the injector/s because of this missing signal input.

We got a long way to go to fix this problem.
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Monday, September 24th, 2007 AT 6:53 PM
Tiny
BLM
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I performed the following steps: I observed all of the markings for both cams and the crankshaft sprockets. I followed the book by placing the crankshaft at 11:00, and located the marked links on both timing chains. Before closing up the front cover, I performed two "dry runs", where I would time both sprockets, rotate the engine several times with a tourque wrench, and tear it back apart until I was satisfied that all marks were properly aligned. I verified that I was on the compression stroke, because all valves for the #1 cylinder were closed, which means it is in the compression stroke.
I followed the book to the letter, so I hope the book was right.

I measured 40psi fuel pressure, which stayed at 40 psi after shutting off the engine for at least 5 minutes, indicating that there was no appreciable leak-down.

To determine the spark, I used a spark tester. All cylinders had a good, consistent spark.

As far as the crankshaft position sensor is concerned, I took apart the harness, and ohmed out the wires to it. There were no shorts or opens, and the CKP itself read 345 ohms. The book said it should be between 290 and 390. However, I don't have an oscilloscope, so I can't actually measure the waveform. I may consider replacing it, since it costs less than $20.00. I don't mind spending that much to eliminate that as a suspect.

I don't know how to measure the signals to the fuel injectors, but I agree, that should be next. I will say, though, that during the starting process, some of the spark plugs had gas on them, so the fuel injectors are at least doing something.

Do you think it would be worth it to get a used oscilloscope? Alternatively, what would happen if I manually turned the engine a few degrees at a time, and looked at the CKP with a flukemeter - would that tell me anything?

Thanks.
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Monday, September 24th, 2007 AT 8:23 PM
Tiny
RASMATAZ
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No for the scope unless you're planning to be a full time tech or you're a tech this moment trying to pull a fast one on me lol.

Have you tried priming it? Does it start?

The CPS It should give something its rotating or a wiggle, to the PCM and in turn tells the ICM to fire the coil/s. Don't forget to turn key On.

My way I use the impact its gonna give something either it backwards or forward. I want some kind of movement on it.

BTW I love the way you describe your procedures. Your on the money with Valve/Ignition Timing.

Good LUck
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Tuesday, September 25th, 2007 AT 12:22 AM
Tiny
BLM
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How do you prime the engine?
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Tuesday, September 25th, 2007 AT 7:17 AM
Tiny
RASMATAZ
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Hit it with carb cleaner thru the throttle body and attempt to fire it up.
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Tuesday, September 25th, 2007 AT 1:24 PM
Tiny
BLM
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I've tried that, about 10 seconds spray, and it didn't make a difference. Thanks, anyway.
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Tuesday, September 25th, 2007 AT 5:33 PM

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