2004 Ford Ranger

Tiny
ARLENECAF
  • MEMBER
  • 2004 FORD RANGER
I have a 2004 Ford Ranger 3.0L and it has 65,000 miles. We have done regular maintenance on the vehicle and I have even had the transmission serviced so that I don't have any problems. My engine light came on and I thought it was possible that I didn't tighten the gas cap so low and behold after three times the engine light went out. I then started to notice that every time I went to put gas in the truck it seemed like the engine light wanted to come on. The reading I was getting was a P0305 code which indicates that is a misfire on the #5 piston. My husband then decided to change the spark plugs and plug wires - we also changed the coil pack. The engine light is still coming on and there are certain times that it wants to spit and sputter and it seems like I have absolutely no power and then it catches and all is fine and then the engine light comes on again the next day. I was hoping someone out in the Ford world can give us an idea as to what we should check next. When I went to the local Ford dealer the engine light was not on and they told me to keep driving the truck and when it happens again they could run a diagnostic on the truck, but it never seems to happen when I am near a Ford dealer.

I will be greatful for any suggestions as to what we should check next.
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Friday, February 16th, 2007 AT 9:13 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
These often have a mass air flow sensor problem, cleaning may be possible, Usually it throws a po171 or po174 code however. Recheck the codes next time it happens.
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Friday, February 16th, 2007 AT 9:29 PM
Tiny
ARLENECAF
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How do you clean the mass air, spray the element with carb or brake cleaner? Thanks much Arlene
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Friday, February 16th, 2007 AT 10:05 PM
Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
I wouldn't use either one, crc is one company that makes an aerosol spray electrical parts cleaner, I have heard of isopropyl alcohol used as well.

Here is one persons technique:

It seems that a "missing" engine culprit is actually the computer's sensor inside the Mass Air Flow Sensor (MAF). It eventually just gets a little dirty or builds up its own patina in the filament wires. A dirty or slightly patinated filament will send the wrong air reading to the computer, saying it is getting more air than it really is and the computer will tell the EFI to send in the wrong mix of fuel, thus, the bogging. The patina seems to form faster if you live in a damp climate. If you have had bogging or missing or idle spots, about every 25K miles plan on this quick cleaning job:
When your engine is cool, remove the wiring clip from the side of the black plastic sensor part of the MAF aluminum body. To remove the MAF interior sensor wire, you will need a Security Star (Size T15 or T20) screwdriver or screwdriver bit for a power screwdriver. Remove the two security star-head screws and carefully remove the sensor. You will see the two sensor filaments they look almost like the filaments on a light bulb. Carefully spray the filaments with an O2 safe carburetor cleaner, such as Gumout. Let it dry thoroughly. I help mine along with a careful blast or two of canned dry air. While it is drying carefully wipe the aluminum mount surface of the MAF body if there is any dust there, but be careful not to get dust in the mount hole. When the sensor is dry, replace the sensor back in the MAF body and secure with the security star-head screws. These don't need to be torqued down, just simply hand tight. Replace the wiring clip. Then start up your engine.
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Saturday, February 17th, 2007 AT 4:13 AM

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