Ford Esort 2001 service

Tiny
KEVWISE1
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 FORD
I had my car serviced at a Ford dealership near home. I had tie rod ends replaced, serpentine belt, and timing belt replaced too. The total bill came out to $1122.75 their labor wage was $92. I would like to know an estimate on how long it usually take to replace these parts (separately if possible). Thank you
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Wednesday, January 10th, 2007 AT 3:24 PM

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Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
Hour a side on inners, 1/2 hour on outers.
Serp belt is done when the timing belt is done, a couple hours.
Anything left over for us?
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Wednesday, January 10th, 2007 AT 3:54 PM
Tiny
KEVWISE1
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So this is about 4-5 hours of work plus parts. Does the $1122.75 bill fit the job?
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Wednesday, January 10th, 2007 AT 3:58 PM
Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
Not to be a wise guy, but does it matter at this point?
Why is price a concern now? Time to change parts are not always having a direct relationship to the time the car is there. If one guy takes it apart at the end of the day, he gets sick the next day, the car is setting until he comes back. It is not good to bring in a second tech to finish the job.

Pricing in this industry is illogical many times. A dealership "may" charge book to to do inner tie rods some "require " rack removal according to the r& r procedure. Most often it doesn't really. The dealer doesn't always use OEM parts. Everyone has a different mark up and different ways of estimating.

This is somthing that may help.
The cost of replacing a part
The cost of replacing a part is a very general question that unless specified exactly is hard to answer. First, is who is replacing the part? Is the Dealer, an independent repair shop, a junkyard, the guy next door or you doing the replacement. These will all yield different prices. Not to mention that within all of these will be different labor rates and different part price mark ups.
Second, what is the quality of the part? Is it a name brand, generic (white box, economy), OEM or used part? All of these will be different. Price will even differ between name brands, sometimes significantly. Thirdly, What is the warranty of the part and who is offering the warranty (the shop the parts house or the manufacturer). Limited Lifetime will have restrictions. Lifetime warranty isn t always the best part either. Fourthly, Each vehicle can have different options that will affect how long it takes to change a part or make it call for a different part. Such as heavy duty cooling system, air conditioning, 4x4 s may have a steel plate that may need removal, Automatic or manual transmission, the list goes on. Fifthly, What additional parts will be required? Long life coolant or standard coolant, R12 or R134a air conditioning freon if it needs to be discharged or replaced? Additional adapters other fluids that may need to be added or changed? All of this will affect price. Sixthly, is the car a new car or an older car? Labor manuals or guides are set up based on a new car. Additional time may be required due to seized or rusted bolts, additional aftermarket accessories that were installed etc. So you can see where there is a great potential for variances. I offer this insight: If you take it to an independent garage like I always recommend, consider how long they have been in business. What is the quality of there work, are they honest?

So is that a "no"?
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Wednesday, January 10th, 2007 AT 4:04 PM

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