2002 Ford Explorer Explorer will crank over, but won't star

Tiny
MRSTANG77
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 FORD EXPLORER
  • 4 CYL
  • AWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 115,000 MILES
I'm coming to a dead end. Need help. Went out to start the explorer and it would just crank over, and not fire. I hooked up a fue pressure gauge and I have 60lbs on the rail. I checked to make sure I'm getting spark on all cyl. Via the coil and I am getting spark. Thought maybe it was the crankshaft postion sensor, replaced with no luck. Going to replace the camshaft position sensor thinking maybe that could be the problem. Any ideas?
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Tuesday, February 10th, 2009 AT 4:45 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
IMPALASS
  • EXPERT
Hello -

To better assist you is your model just an Explorer or Sport or Sport Trac. Also please provide your engine size in liter and the 8th digit of your VIN.

Please go to Auto Zone (AZ) or O'Reilly's (OR) and use their tool check out program and get the code scanner. Check your codes, if you find something and you don't get it fixed and need to get back with us, please make sure you tell us exactly what the code was, number and all. Example, if the code was E0568 O2 Sensor bad. Then make sure you give us all of that.

Your Engine Coolant Sensor (ECT) can also prevent this if defective.


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/248015_Picture1_52.jpg

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Tuesday, February 10th, 2009 AT 9:42 PM
Tiny
MRSTANG77
  • MEMBER
It has the 4.0L engine code E
I just installed the cam sensor with no luck.
I scanned the veichal and came up with O2 sensors below threshold on both banks. I had one cat plug up on me months ago, and I hollowed out all the cats to be a cheep fix.
I have to order the Engine Coolant Temperature sensor, hope to have it installed tomorrow.
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Wednesday, February 11th, 2009 AT 3:03 PM
Tiny
IMPALASS
  • EXPERT
Hello -

Thanks for the info - please keep me posted.

Here is some info for you on the O2s

O2 Sensor Strategies: Unheated one- or two-wire O2 sensors on 1976 through early 1990s applications should be replaced every 30,000 to 50,000 miles to assure reliable performance. Heated 3 and 4-wire O2 sensors on mid-1980s through mid-1990s applications should be changed every 60,000 miles. On OBD II equipped vehicles, the recommended replacement interval is 100,000 miles. The O2 sensor's responsiveness and voltage output can diminish with age and exposure to certain contaminants in the exhaust such as lead, sulfur, silicone (coolant leaks) and phosphorus (oil burning). If the sensor becomes contaminated, it may not respond very quickly to changes in the air/fuel mixture causing a lag in the PCM's ability to control the air/fuel mixture.
The sensor's voltage output may decline giving a lower than normal reading. This may cause the PCM to react as if the fuel mixture were leaner than it really is resulting in an overly rich fuel mixture.
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Wednesday, February 11th, 2009 AT 9:51 PM

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