1995 Ford Escort LX 160,000 miles 1.9L

Tiny
JACKPFLYNN
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 FORD ESCORT
Hi,

I am not getting any heat in my car. The blower works fine. The climate-control temp lever seems to be fine, since w/ A/C on I can fade from cold to luke-warm. Two years ago the heat worked sometimes and not others. Last year it did not work at all, but if I waited a long time (15 minutes) before turning on the blower, I would get about 5 seconds of heat and then back to cold. This year, I don't even get the five seconds of heat. And a new addition this year: According to the temperature gague the car does not warm up after 15 minutes of driving. The gauge shows just above the "C". But when I touch the upper cooling hose (on the right) it is quite hot.

Coolant level is normal.

I have never used stop-leak.

Thermostat appears to be working. When the engine is first started (and cold), I can't feel anything flowing through the upper cooling hose. After the car heats up, the hose is hot and you can feel fluid moving through it.

My first thought was the heater control valve, but in doing a fair amount of reasearch, I have not found a single reference to such a valve in the 1995 LX.

My next guess would be a clog in the heater core. I plan on flushing, and reverse flushing this tonight to see if there is any improvement.

I am still suspicious of the fact that the temperature gague is so low, thinking that there is some kind of electrical valve that is not opening.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Monday, October 29th, 2007 AT 2:42 PM

7 Replies

Tiny
JACK42
  • MEMBER
Sounds more like your thermostat is stuck part way open. The flush might not be a bad idea as well
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Monday, October 29th, 2007 AT 3:02 PM
Tiny
JACKPFLYNN
  • MEMBER
Yes. That was the case, but it did not fix the heat issue. I replaced the thermostat, and found mineral deposits like small rocks in the thermostat housing. I cleaned these out, replaced the thermostat and tested the systerm.

Now, it is back to the old scenario where I have good heat for about 15 seconds, then luke-warm heat after that. The engine heats up quickly. Thermostat is working great.

The heat is slightly better but is still not "heat"

I have two questions:

1. Since I found "small rock" size mineral deposits, I want to flush the system. But, if I use the standard method, there is no way these deposits would fit through the small valve at the bottom of the radiator, or as I suspect, through the heater system. How do I do a more thorough flush?

2. Is there a vacuum valve or an electrical valve that allows coolant through the heater core under certain conditions and not others?

Thanks again.
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Tuesday, October 30th, 2007 AT 7:32 AM
Tiny
JACK42
  • MEMBER
I dont think your car has a heater control valve, if it doe sit would be inline on the heater hose. Sounds like a flow problem through the heater core, have th esystem power flushed and possibly an extra on the heater core
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Tuesday, October 30th, 2007 AT 8:01 AM
Tiny
JACKPFLYNN
  • MEMBER
Can you explain what a power flush is? I would rather do this myself, if possible.

Thanks.
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Tuesday, October 30th, 2007 AT 9:14 AM
Tiny
JACK42
  • MEMBER
That is where a machine is hooked up to the cooling systema nd water is pushed through it at a specific pressure. Careful doing this yourself, car cooling system only is designerd around 16 or so psi, a garden hose full pressure is way too much
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Tuesday, October 30th, 2007 AT 10:05 AM
Tiny
JACKPFLYNN
  • MEMBER
I took the hoses off the heater core and sprayed a garden hose into the "out" tube, reverse flushing the heater coil. Some sludge looking stuff began to creep out the opposite hole, and within 30 seconds it was flowing clean water. I hooked it all up, refilled the system, and it works perfectly. Also, the engne seems to "warm up" way faster. Before the thermostat opens up, the fluid is on a closed route through the heater coil. Now that it can flow freely the thermometer (and the whole cooling system) warms up faster.

Thanks for your help.
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Tuesday, October 30th, 2007 AT 7:00 PM
Tiny
JACK42
  • MEMBER
Glad to hear you wont be freezing this winter
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Wednesday, October 31st, 2007 AT 7:25 AM

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