Ford Escape start issues

Tiny
LENNY43
  • MEMBER
  • 2004 FORD ESCAPE
  • 3.0L
  • V6
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 50,000 MILES
My car would not start in the rain. I took it to a local garage and they replaced the battery.
Then after a while it started again, I took it to another garage and they replaced the battery.
Then while I was driving the car this week the radio cut out, then it lost power and bunny hopped before dying. I managed to get the car back home by connecting a battery charge pack and driving it home still attached,
A mechanic came and looked at it and said it was the battery! No, I don't think so, then he said it must be the alternator.
I have done some research and I think it could be the ignition coils.
Please help.
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Monday, February 15th, 2016 AT 10:56 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
CATAFINA
  • MEMBER
I suggest getting the battery load tested to check its condition, if it is okay then take your alternator and have it checked too.
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Tuesday, February 16th, 2016 AT 1:15 AM
Tiny
LENNY43
  • MEMBER
The battery is good. I will get the alternator checked out before I spend too much on it
Thanks for you reply.
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Tuesday, February 16th, 2016 AT 1:30 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Excuse me for butting in to your conversation, but this is not an ignition coil problem. Removing the generator for in-store testing is not a good idea. Those testers have at most a one horsepower motor to drive the generator. It can take over five horsepower to run it wide open for proper testing and that can only be done with the car's engine. Testing on-car also includes the entire charging system in the test, not just the one part.

Instead, just use an inexpensive digital voltmeter to measure battery voltage while the engine is running. It must be between 13.75 and 14.75 volts. If it is low, suspect the generator / voltage regulator. If it is within that range, that means it is okay to have the second half of the test done. That requires a professional load tester to measure full-load output current and "ripple" voltage. If the most current you can get is exactly one third of the generator's rated current, and ripple voltage is high, the generator has a bad diode. 30 amps from the common 90 amp generator is not enough to meet the demands of the electrical system under all conditions. The battery will have to make up the difference until it slowly runs down over days or weeks. Then you have to charge it again with a home battery charger.
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Wednesday, February 17th, 2016 AT 8:21 AM

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