2003 Dodge Stratus Idleing

Tiny
TOMLANDIS
  • MEMBER
  • 2003 DODGE STRATUS
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 54,000 MILES
I came home from a short drive today in my Dodge Stratus 2 dr. When I got home I parked the car and had to move it, as I put it in drive the car didn't move, "usually when you take your foot off the brake the car idle's", when I put the car in reverse and did the same thing the car didn't move. When I gave it gas it acted a little weird but nothing big. Do I have anything to worry about or could it just have stalled?
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Monday, April 6th, 2009 AT 7:54 PM

6 Replies

Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Stalled? Was the engine running?
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Tuesday, April 7th, 2009 AT 12:41 PM
Tiny
TOMLANDIS
  • MEMBER
Yea the engine was still running
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Tuesday, April 7th, 2009 AT 9:48 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
I get the impression the car is not rolling freely unless you press the gas pedal a little. If that's correct, there is most likely a brake sticking. This could be a rear parking brake sticking due to a rusted cable, or a front brake sticking due to a variety of reasons. The cause could be as simple as rust and corrosion buildup on a piston in a front caliper, or as expensive as brake fluid contamination from someone adding power steering fluid, transmission oil, or engine oil to the brake fluid.

The cause of sticking brakes should be checked by a professional right away. The brake linings will be worn away very quickly causing a safety hazard. Gas mileage will be greatly reduced too.

Caradiodoc
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Wednesday, April 8th, 2009 AT 12:13 AM
Tiny
TOMLANDIS
  • MEMBER
Yea I had my mechanic grease the caliber and he said it should be fine so I will keep you posted if it continues
thanks alot
-tom
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Wednesday, April 8th, 2009 AT 6:43 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Greasing a number of caliper contact points is a necessary part of a quality brake job, but this isn't what I was referring to. A ring of dirt or corrosion builds up on the sealing surface of the piston inside the caliper, and in contact with the fluid. As the linings wear,
the piston moves out to self adjust. Eventually that corrosion works under the seal preventing the piston from releasing. Years ago the fix was to rebuild the caliper and clean or replace the piston, but today, rebuilt calipers are so inexpensive, we just replace them.

A less common problem is a pinched rubber brake hose. If the mechanic can catch the locking brake problem while it's occurring, he will open a bleeder screw. If the caliper releases, pressurized fluid is being trapped by the brake hose.

Caradiodoc
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Wednesday, April 8th, 2009 AT 9:27 PM
Tiny
KARENCAREN
  • MEMBER
Greasing will make it ok right now. But be sure to check the calipers if it needs a replacement.
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Tuesday, April 21st, 2009 AT 8:04 PM

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