2003 Dodge Neon CAMSHAFT POSITION SENSOR

Tiny
PEPE92685
  • MEMBER
  • 2003 DODGE NEON
  • 4 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 68,000 MILES
A FEW WEEKS AGO I REPLACE THE CMP BEACUSE A GOT AN CHECK ENGINE LIGHT. THE SCANNER SAID IT WAS THE CMP SENSOR, BUT NOW I GOT ANOTHER CODE ( P0344) WHICH SAYS " rationality error detected for intermittent loss of camshaft position sensor" WHAT D U THINK THAT COULD BE? DO U THINK IS BECAUSE I ONLY REPLACED TE CMP SENOR BUT NOT THE CMP SENSOR TARGET MAGNET? D U THINK THAT I COULD DAMAGE MY ENGINE IF I DONT FIX IT SOON?
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Saturday, August 9th, 2008 AT 6:45 PM

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Tiny
BMRFIXIT
  • EXPERT
DTC P0344: CAMSHAFT POSITION SENSOR INTERMITTENT
Monitored & Set Conditions
Circuit is monitored when engine is cranking or running. DTC will set when the failure counter reaches 20. This is a one trip fault.
Possible Causes

? Wiring Harness Inspection
? (K7) 5-Volt Supply Circuit Open Or Shorted To Ground
? Tone Wheel/Pulse Ring Inspection
? Checking CKP Signal With The DRBIII(R) Lab Scope Probe
? Camshaft Position Sensor
? (K44) CMP Signal Circuit Open
? (K44) CMP Signal Circuit Short To Ground
? (K44) CMP Signal Circuit Shorted To B+
? (K44) CMP Signal Circuit Short To (K7) 5 Volts
? PCM

Testing
1. Ignition on, engine not running. With the DRBIII(R) scan tool, read DTCs and record the related freeze frame data. Is the Good Trip Counter displayed and equal to zero? If yes, go to next step. If no, see INTERMITTENT CONDITION under SELF-DIAGNOSTICS SYSTEM.
WARNING: When the engine is operating, do not stand in a direct line with the fan. Do not put your hands near the pulleys, belts or fan. Do not wear loose clothing.

2. Turn the ignition off. With the DRBIII(R) lab scope probe and the Miller Special Tool (6801), backprobe the (K44) CMP signal circuit in the CMP harness connector. Ignition on, engine not running. Observe the lab scope screen. Start the engine. Observe the lab scope screen. Are there any irregular or missing signals? If yes, go to next step. If no, go to step 8.

3. Visually inspect the related wire harness including the ground circuit. Look for any chafed pierced, pinched, or partially broken wires. Visually inspect the related wire harness connectors. Look for broken, bent, pushed out, or corroded terminals. Ensure the CKP sensor and the CMP sensor are properly installed and the mounting bolt(s) are tight. Refer to any TSBs that may apply. Were any of the above conditions present? If yes, repair as necessary. If no, go to next step.

4. Turn the ignition off. Disconnect the CMP sensor connector. Ignition on, engine not running. Measure the voltage on the (K7) 5-volt supply circuit. Is the voltage between 4.5-5.5 volts? If yes, go to next step. If no, repair the open or short to ground in the (K7) 5-volt supply circuit. Use Miller Special Tool (8815) when checking for an open circuit to prevent PCM harness connector terminal damage.

5. Turn the ignition off. Carefully disconnect the battery negative ground cable. Remove the CMP sensor. Inspect the tone wheel/pulse ring for damage, foreign material, or excessive movement. Were any problems found? If yes, repair or replace the tone wheel/pulse ring as necessary. If no, go to next step.
WARNING: When the engine is operating, do not stand in a direct line with the fan. Do not put your hands near the pulleys, belts or fan. Do not wear loose clothing.

6. An intermittent glitch in the CKP sensor can cause the DTC P0344 to set. Turn the ignition off. With the DRBIII(R) lab scope probe and the Miller Special Tool (6801), backprobe the (K24) CKP signal circuit in the CKP sensor harness connector. Ignition on, engine not running. Wiggle the related wire harness and lightly tap on the CKP sensor. Observe the lab scope screen. Start the engine. Observe the lab scope screen. Are there any irregular or missing signals? If yes, repair as necessary.

7. If there are no possible causes remaining replace the camshaft position sensor.
CAUTION:Do not probe the PCM harness connectors. Probing the PCM harness connectors will damage the PCM terminals resulting in poor terminal to pin connection. Install Miller Special Tool (8815) to perform diagnosis.

8. Turn the ignition off. Disconnect the CMP sensor connector. Disconnect the PCM connector. Measure the resistance in the (K44) CMP signal circuit from the CMP sensor harness connector to the appropriate terminal of Miller Special Tool (8815). Wiggle the related wire harness while taking this measurement. Is the resistance below 5.0 ohms? If yes, go to next step. If no, repair the open/high resistance in the (K44) CMP signal circuit.

9. Turn the ignition off. Disconnect the PCM harness connectors. Disconnect the CMP sensor connector. Measure the resistance between ground and the (K44) CMP signal circuit in the CMP sensor harness connector. Wiggle the related wire harness while monitoring the resistance value. Does the resistance stay below 100 ohms? If yes, repair the short to ground in the (K44) CMP signal circuit. If no, go to next step.

10. Turn the ignition off. Disconnect the CMP sensor connector. Reconnect the PCM harness connectors. Ignition on, engine not running. Measure the voltage on the (K44) CMP signal circuit. Wiggle the related wire harness while taking this measurement. Does the voltage ever increase above 5.5 volts? If yes, repair the short to B+ voltage in the (K44) CMP signal circuit. If no, go to next step.

11. Turn the ignition off. Disconnect the PCM harness connectors. Disconnect the CMP harness connector. Measure the resistance between the (K7) 5-volt supply circuit and the signal circuit in the CMP sensor harness connector. Wiggle the related wire harness while taking this measurement. Is the resistance below 5.0 ohms? If yes, repair the short to the (K7) 5-volt supply circuit in the (K44) CMP signal circuit. If no, go to next step.

12. Before continuing, disconnect the PCM harness connector and check the related wiring terminals for corrosion, damage or terminal push out. Repair as necessary. Pay particular attention to all power and ground circuits. If there are no possible causes remaining, replace and program the PCM. See PROGRAMMING.

Best of luck

8/10/2008
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Sunday, August 10th, 2008 AT 9:49 AM

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