2001 Dodge Dakota Starting trouble. Sometimes

Tiny
JBRY311
  • MEMBER
  • 2001 DODGE DAKOTA
Engine Mechanical problem
2001 Dodge Dakota V8 Two Wheel Drive Automatic

For the last few months my truck takes 3-4 seconds to start. I only have to turn the key over once, there's no repeating, but it doesn't fire up right away. I've had it checked out by a mechanic and all he found was an emissions leak, but assured me it wouldn't cause the problem. I should also mention that when the truck's been running it normally fires right up. Another thing I've noticed is that when the temperature is below 65 or so, my truck usually starts without hesitation, whether the engine is hot or cold. Sounds confusing, but that's the deal. I've had the fuel fressure checked and it's reading normal, injectors have been serviced, and a tune-up has been performed. The problem still exists. Any advice?
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Tuesday, December 29th, 2009 AT 4:33 PM

5 Replies

Tiny
CH112063
  • MEMBER
I would advise having your engine tested for problems using the Chrysler connector. I'm hoping the OBD connector showed only an emissions problem, but a evaporative problem can cause the exact trouble your experiencing because a type of vapor lock may be occuring under certain temperatures. The Chrysler scan may show up the sensor or other problem. Try loosening the gas cap, next time, before you think this long crank time may occur. All the emission systems have a direct effect on driveability and hard starting troubles. This was usually a fuel pump problem. No more.
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Tuesday, December 29th, 2009 AT 7:08 PM
Tiny
JBRY311
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Thanks for the reply. Is this problem generally expensive to correct?
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Wednesday, December 30th, 2009 AT 11:04 AM
Tiny
CH112063
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Not on the first time. The first time I had a vapor lock problem was on a 75 Toyota p/up with CA. Emissions, it would get hot, and the pressure would raise putting the fuel system under positive pressure, of course this was low pressure carb. But electric pump. I changed a check valve. Now its more expensive. I've changed cannisters flooded, gas caps, sol. Switching valves, plugs, pump, all for this type of problem, and more.
Even though todays engines have more devices to handle fuel vapors, a failure in any part that is used for storing these vapors could cause this. The gas tank is the main source of vapors, and the fuel pump can be easily affected. I never saw too many that would cause a terrible start on a 50 psi system, but if its only hot, it could be this, there is a pump, valves, hoses and a gas cap that could be affecting your starting. See if before you start it, releasing the gas cap lets air out, this is one way, sometimes a suction is heard also. Usually long crank times are not too much temperature related but more consistant. So you may have an intermittant fuel pressure problem. But was ok when your mechanic tested it. Whatever the reason he told you that was causing his concern may be the clue. Glad to help. Also the charcoal cannister(used for storing these fuel vapors) is only purged back into your engine when its hot, the temp sensor controlling this or flooded cannister may be causing vapors to enter into your intake at the wrong time, you need to check Chryslers codes with their cable. Good luck out there. K?
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Wednesday, December 30th, 2009 AT 7:53 PM
Tiny
JBRY311
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Is it possible that it's an electrical issue? I've been on many forums and most people with a similar problem still experienced the problem after they had their fuel pumps, injectors, etc checked. As I am. All the obvious things it could be weren't causing it. One guy said his was an electrical issue in a wiring harness. Could it be something like that?
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Thursday, January 14th, 2010 AT 9:05 PM
Tiny
CH112063
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Yes, it is possible, especially on a 2001. That is why a scan is necessary, it could even be the plugs that are unable to restart because of any number of rich fuel, or even lean fuel problems. The sensors that signal the engine computer could cause this. A fuel pump is another problem on the Dakota, so I would see if any fault codes are present, with a DRBIII(R), its pricey I know, but this is the way its done, its a very expensive test and scanner, but it helps find some problems other scanners miss. If you would like to check it yourself, a fuel pressure tester is necessary and they have a nice one at the store, its good for many uses too. You could connect it, and make sure your holding pressure ok, after you turn the engine off, if its too low, turning the key on repeatedly will help on a restart, ok. You need to check this as it happens with no fault codes, you could disconnect the vapor cannister purge hose on the intake it goes to the front cannister, if ok, you have found out that it is releasing fuel in the engine at the wrong timje.
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Sunday, January 17th, 2010 AT 10:36 PM

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