2000 Dodge Dakota car makes bad grinding noise.

Tiny
SHADOWFOX5401252
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 DODGE DAKOTA
  • V8
  • 4WD
  • MANUAL
  • 185,988 MILES
My truck makes a horrible grinding noise while driving. It only occurs when the vehicle is in motion. It idles perfectly. It still operates normally, accelerates fine, very responsive, handles normally. The only problem is the grinding noise.
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Saturday, April 17th, 2010 AT 12:50 AM

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Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Have the brakes been inspected? If not, that's the place to start. Other possible causes include a front wheel bearing if the noise gets louder as speed increases and it sounds like an airplane engine, and a front outer cv joint. You can run it in 4wd with the truck raised off the ground, then run it in 2wd. If the noise is still there in 2wd, suspect a rear axle bearing, differential bearing, or gear noise.

If you still can't find the source, find a mechanic who has a "Chassis Ear". That is a set of six microphones that are clipped onto suspect points, then listened to with a receiver during a test drive. Moving the microphones around will pinpoint the source.

Caradiodoc
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Saturday, April 17th, 2010 AT 5:45 AM
Tiny
SHADOWFOX5401252
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Out of all of those suspected problems, how much will it cost to have the most expensive one repaired?
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Saturday, April 17th, 2010 AT 9:49 AM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Can't guess at exact amounts, but anything requiring disassembly of the rear axle would probably be most expensive. It would also be the least likely cause of the noise.

The most common source of grinding would be the front brakes, especially if it only occurs during braking. If the front brake pads are worn so metal is grinding on metal, you will probably need one or two front rotors as well as the pads. Rotors have come down in price over the last ten years, but you are still looking at around $200.00 to $300.00 for a front brake job, maybe a little more.

If the grinding still occurs when you are not pressing the rake pedal, but it is brake-related, there could be a sticking front caliper. Here too, the cost of professionally rebuilt calipers has come down a real lot compared to the early 1990s. The rubber hoses should be replaced too if there is any sign of dry rotting or cracking of the outer casing. These parts can add perhaps another $150.00 to $200.00 to the bill.

The best thing to do is get an inspection and estimate. Sears used to offer free front end and brake inspections in the '80s. They might still do that. Labor rates vary a lot across the country too so it's hard to give a better guess on cost of repairs, especially when we aren't sure it's even a serious problem.

Caradiodoc
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Saturday, April 17th, 2010 AT 3:29 PM
Tiny
DAVE308
  • MEMBER
I had a constant grinding/rumbling from the rear of my '01 Dakota about 2 years ago. Sound was proportional to ground-speed. Turns out I destroyed a rear differential bearing because of a leak in the differential cover seal (ran out of fluid). I managed to find a similar rear axle at a local junkyard for $500 (axle ratio needs to match - mine is a 3.55). My uncle and I swapped out the axle in a day (not gonna lie, it was painful but not unbearable). Only tools required were a jack, jack stands, sockets and wrench, screwdriver, vise-grips, a pipe for some leverage, WD-40, hammer, and some elbow grease. I did need to rent a double-flaring brake line tool from autozone to reconnect the brakes. But in retrospect, the process was simple, and it was a good learning experience.
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Wednesday, December 15th, 2010 AT 3:01 PM

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