Constant misfire on bank 1, cylinders 1, 3 and 5?

Tiny
JUSTBLESSED
  • MEMBER
  • 2013 DODGE CHARGER
  • V6
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 178,536 MILES
Changed coils changed plugs haven’t changed injectors yet but other than that I’m out of ideas. Anybody know why a constant misfire may happen on bank 1?
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Monday, August 28th, 2023 AT 7:43 AM

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Tiny
AL514
  • MECHANIC
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Hello, a timing issue can cause an entire bank to miss fire, also if there is a Catalytic Converter on that side of the engine that is separate from the other side of the engine. When a timing chain either breaks a chain guide or the tensioner has failed for that chain it can jump a tooth or a few on the camshaft gear throwing off timing for that side of the engine. Are you getting a Check engine light and misfire codes for those 3 cylinders and any other codes? You could try a static compression test on those cylinders and compare them with the other bank. Or if there are covers easy enough to access the camshaft sprockets/gears to check the actual timing marks lined up. I'll check some service info and see what it has for a timing setup.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-test-engine-compression
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Monday, August 28th, 2023 AT 11:44 AM
Tiny
AL514
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It's quite a lot to pull one of the valve covers versus the other side. But if you have access to a decent scan tool that can read what the camshaft timing is, it will be under live engine data.

There will be a data PID that should state Camshaft timing- Actual and Desired. If you find that the "Actual" is way off from what the engine computer (PCM) thinks it should be, "Desired". Then there might be an issue with the chain, tensioner, possibly a camshaft actuator which is responsible for advancing or retarding the camshaft valve timing or a broken chain guide can cause that entire bank to misfire like this. The fastest check would be with a scan tool since you don't need to take anything apart to see what the camshafts are doing.
If there is reason to go further into the timing chains, then checking the timing marks by pulling the valve covers and lining everything up would be a way to check it.
I would also make sure the oil level is up to where it should be just to verify that.

If you have access to more technical testing, using an oscilloscope and doing a relative compression test would show if that bank of cylinders is all low on compression. You could even try a clear flood mode test. Which is where you will hold the gas pedal to the floor and if the vehicle has Clear flood mode it shouldn't start. And you can listen to the cranking cadence, and you should hear an uneven type of noise that's caused by low compression cylinders.

Here are a few guides to help but try a clear flood cranking with the gas pedal to the floor, If the vehicle starts it doesn't have clear flood mode, but I think it should. Even record a video with your phone if you want and post it here and we can see if it's possible to hear anything odd about the cranking cadence of the engine.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/how-to-test-engine-compression

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/the-reasons-for-low-compression

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/symptoms-of-low-compression
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Monday, August 28th, 2023 AT 12:06 PM

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