2003 Chrysler Town and Country Transmission rough shifting

Tiny
STEVE_C80
  • MEMBER
  • 2003 CHRYSLER TOWN AND COUNTRY
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 78,000 MILES
The transmission on my 2003 Chrysler minivan began making a hard downshift from third to second about 2 months ago. I took it to a repair shop where they rebuilt it. About two weeks later the problem returned and the mechanic said that the problem was caused by a faulty control module. He repaced the module with a used one. About two weeks later the problem returned again. I have a warranty on all the work but want to know if anyone is familiar with this problem on Chrysler minivans and what the cure is. Other than the extremely rough downshift the transmission seems to be operating normally.
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Wednesday, June 18th, 2008 AT 7:21 PM

3 Replies

Tiny
MOUSER
  • MEMBER
We are having the same problem. The dealership will not fix a problem unless thier computer says there is something wrong. Mine has even started stalling. Our dealerships answer is drive it until it breaks down. Give you alot of confidence doesn't it?
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Tuesday, July 1st, 2008 AT 10:03 AM
Tiny
WILLIAM BERRY
  • MEMBER
My 2003 Town and Country van started having rough shifts from 1st to 2nd gear with gentle acceleration. It later developed intermittent down shifts with no speed changes while cruise control was active (level ground). Problem was not with the transmission but with the Throttle Position Sensor. $27.00 part fixed the problems!
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Sunday, May 28th, 2017 AT 3:32 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Thank you for that update. In fact, the original post didn't mention anything about having read the diagnostic fault codes. That could have saved them a lot of time and money. The description of the symptoms suggests it was going into "limp mode" where it goes to and stays in second gear.

The Transmission Computer also learns and stores four values called the "clutch volume index", (CVI) referring to the volume of fluid it takes to apply each of the four clutch packs. An experienced transmission specialist can tell by those numbers how close the transmission is to needing to be rebuilt. Without that, there is no way to tell how much life is left in it because based on those values, the computer constantly modifies its shift "overlap" to maintain a "like-new" shift feel. You don't get the year or two of warning from sloppy shifts like we did with the older transmissions.
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Sunday, May 28th, 2017 AT 8:07 PM

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