1999 Chrysler Town and Country Van shakes - not steering wh

Tiny
JSMITHTOWN AND COUNTRY
  • MEMBER
  • 1999 CHRYSLER TOWN AND COUNTRY
  • 6 CYL
  • 2WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 249,000 MILES
This problem is driving me crazy. My 99 Town and country shakes pretty badly from 35-50 mph. I do not feel the shaking on the steering wheel. In fact I can let go of the steering wheel while the van shakes and it doesn't move at all. I had two new tires put on and the others balanced.

We recently replaced a cracked flywheel and the problem started a couple of months later.

Any ideas?
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Tuesday, July 21st, 2009 AT 3:21 PM

1 Reply

Tiny
BMRFIXIT
  • EXPERT
Test Drive the vehicle, in the as received condition, at the complaint speed on a smooth road surface with all accessories turned off. Correct any obvious safety related items identified during the Visual Inspection prior to the Test Drive. It is essential to the diagnosis that the repair facility has identified a smooth road and uses it for the entire diagnosis. A smooth surface will reduce the vehicle response to road inputs and allow the diagnosis to concentrate on the rotating components. If the vibration condition has been corrected due to replacement of component(s) return the vehicle to the customer. If the vibration problem is still present make the following checks:

If the vibration changes as you coast in neutral, the problem may be with the driveline, tranny may need to be rebuilt
check axles

If the vibration does not change while coasting then the problem may be caused by tires, wheels or suspension.
If the vibration increases with increasing vehicle speed, the problem may be with imbalance of rotating components (tires, wheels, half shafts, drums or rotors).
If the vibration decreases with increasing vehicle speed, the problem may be with tire/wheel assembly run out.
If the vibration is a low-speed lateral wobble of the body and/or steering wheel oscillations at speeds less than 45 mph (72 kph), the problem may be caused by lateral run out of the tire/wheel assembly.
If the vibration is a mid-speed vibration and is characterized by vibration in the seat, floor, and/or steering wheel at speeds between 35-45 mph (56-72 kph); the problem may be caused by high 2nd order tire/wheel assembly excitation. If torque sensitive, the problem may be driveline related, refer to the Service Manual.
If the vibration is a high-speed vibration and is characterized by vibration in the seat, floor, instrument panel, and/or steering wheel at speeds greater than 60 mph (97 kph); the problem may be caused by high 1st order tire/wheel assembly excitation.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Wednesday, July 22nd, 2009 AT 8:49 PM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides