2000 Chrysler Cirrus Brake Pad Wear

Tiny
CUYLER2006
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 CHRYSLER CIRRUS
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 130,000 MILES
Six months ago I had replaced my rear brake pads because they were worn out. Two months ago my rear passenger side was all worn out so I thought I had a sticky caliper, so I replaced my Calipers, brake pads and rotors on both rear wheels. Today I heard a grinding noise from my rear passenger brake and it is all worn out. What could be causing the premature wear on my rear passenger brake pad. All other brake pads looks good on the other wheels.
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Saturday, April 10th, 2010 AT 9:50 PM

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Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Hi cuyler2006. Welcome to the forum. First of all, be sure the caliper can slide freely on its mounts and bolts. If any mounting bolts have rust pits, the caliper will not release properly. Since you replaced the calipers already, we can rule out sticking pistons. Something else is keeping that caliper applied. To prove this, jack that wheel up and try to spin the wheel by hand. If it does spin freely, apply and release the brake pedal a couple of times, then see if the caliper released. When you catch it sticking, loosen the steel lines at the master cylinder. No air will enter the hydraulic system if you leave the master cylinder cap loose momentarily. If the brake releases, suspect the brake fluid is contaminated with petroleum product such as power steering fluid, engine oil, or transmission fluid. I think this isn't your problem because it should affect the left front caliper at the same time.

If the brake doesn't release by opening the lines at the master cylinder, open the caliper's bleeder screw. If that allows the caliper to release, suspect a constricted rubber hose. I can't remember what the rear hoses look like, but if they have a metal anchor bracket in the middle, suspect rust buildup inside where the bracket is crimped around the hose. Pedal pressure is plenty strong enough to force fluid to the caliper, but it will remain trapped by the constricted hose. As the brake heats up, the fluid will also heat up and expand. That applies the brake harder and produces more heat. A little fluid will sneak through the constriction and go back to the reservoir, then, when the fluid cools down, the brake will gradually release.

Caradiodoc
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Saturday, April 10th, 2010 AT 10:39 PM
Tiny
CUYLER2006
  • MEMBER
That makes sense. When I tried to bleed that side after replacing the caliper I was not getting the flow out of it like I did the other side. It seemed like the line was plugged.
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Sunday, April 11th, 2010 AT 6:27 PM
Tiny
CARADIODOC
  • EXPERT
Another approach would be to have a helper apply light pressure to the brake pedal, then you open the hydraulic system at various places to see where the fluid will flow freely from.

One word of warning that isn't really common knowledge. Stress to your helper that they never push the pedal more than half way to the floor. Debris and corrosion build up in the lower half of the bores in the master cylinder where the seals don't normally travel. When you allow the pedal to go down too far, the lip seals can get torn on that debris. The only fix is to replace the master cylinder. That doesn't happen all the time, but it isn't worth the risk.

Caradiodoc
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Sunday, April 11th, 2010 AT 11:07 PM

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