1988 Cavalier

Tiny
YOLANDAMM
  • MEMBER
  • 1988 CHEVROLET TRUCK
I have a 1988 chevy cavalier(2.0, 4 cylinder), that I am trying to get ready for my daughter. But there is a scary problem. I have took it to three mechanics. They keep fixing other things, not the problem. It has a new battery and starter. It has a map sensor and alternator that's about 2 years old. Heads that were replaced 4 years ago. And many other things. Now, I have put so much time, money, and energy into; I can not stop fixing her.
It ran for many years and when I got a new car I stop driving it.

The problem is every time I drive the car after 20-30 minutes the car completely stops, ( no matter if the car is in park or nuetral). Then when the car cools or sits for a while. It starts right back up. The whole time I driving the car I am sacred. It even drives as it trying to gasp for air. Please help me. I keep getting different answer, such as; heater core, fuel filter, Ignition module or catalytic converter.
What is the problem? :X
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Friday, August 11th, 2006 AT 2:33 PM

2 Replies

Tiny
MIKEYBDMAN
  • MEMBER
I will go ahead and tell you that it is not the heater core. Fuel filter, probably not. Ignition module, possible. Catalytic converter, probably not.
Something is heating up and shutting off until it cools. Most of the time things that overheat are electronic. Ignition module is a possiblity, however I would hate to replace a good one if it isnt the problem.
Here is my take. If the car dies, and wont start until it cools down, it is most likely ignition. You have two coils, a crank sensor, and a direct ignition module. The ign signal comes from the PCM, so we cant completly elimintae that. If one coil was bad, the car would run on two cylinders, and not just quit comlpetly. So by logic we are down to the ignition module and the crank sensor. Both are solid state, and could be effected by heat. Got a coin?
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Friday, August 11th, 2006 AT 8:07 PM
Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
I agree with above post. Having said that, the shop should hook up a fuel pressure gauge and light that tells when spark is happening and drive the car until it stalls. To see what was lost. I have seen fuel pump socks clog up and stall an engine and not restart until the sediment falls. However I am more inclined to agree with Mikeybdman.
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Friday, August 11th, 2006 AT 9:07 PM

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