S-10 Blazer wont start

Tiny
ORCA
  • MEMBER
  • 2010 CHEVROLET S-10
I have a '91 S-10 Blazer with about 165,000 on it. It died on me after losing power and backfiring a couple of times. I found the electrode on the rotor broke off. Replaced the rotor and the engine still will not fire. While towing it off the road the ignition coil burnt out. Replaced the ignition coil and the pick up coil on the distributor. Checked the ignition module - passed. Still will not fire. The supply to the ignition coil shows 12 volts. When I crank the engine it drops to about 8 volts. I pulled the coil wire from the coil and jumped with a screwdriver to see if I got an arc from it and the post on the coil. No spark. Where do I go from here? What further checks do I need to do to isolate the problem?
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Tuesday, July 10th, 2007 AT 2:48 PM

5 Replies

Tiny
LILSCHLICH
  • MEMBER
When you used the screw drive to jump the coil pack to the distributor cap were you turning over the engin? If you were not then you would not see the spark. If you pulled the distributor out did you make a mark on the intake manifold to make sure you put the distributor back in the right spot? If you put the distributor back and were a tooth of you maybe out of time. If so she will not turn over.
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Tuesday, July 10th, 2007 AT 2:58 PM
Tiny
ORCA
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I had help. I cranked, he watched. Using the same procedure is how I know of the voltage drop on the feed to the ignition coil. No joy. Yes I did mark the position of the distributor and lined everything up properly. If I am off it is not by enough to prevent sparking.
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Tuesday, July 10th, 2007 AT 3:22 PM
Tiny
LILSCHLICH
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Since the coil pack burned out you may have burned a fuse. If you replaced the coil pack and you are not getting spark you could have faulty wiring to the coil pack. I would check the fuses first then I would hook up your coil pack and plug wires. Pull the number 1 plug out of the block and hook it up to the number 1 wire. Hold the plug to the block or something metal and see if you get spark to the plug. If you have good fuses and now spark to the plug you could have gotten a bad coil pack.
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Tuesday, July 10th, 2007 AT 3:31 PM
Tiny
ORCA
  • MEMBER
I am thinking about running a pair of wires from the fuse panel to the coil. The fuses in the block that I could identify as possibly on that circut looked good. Is there an in line fuse somewhere that I can't find? I have a Haynes book and the wiring schematic isn't that great. I'll try your suggestion. The local parts stores wont check out a coil for you. I have a feeling the problem lies there. A big question out on the side line is the voltage drop on the supply to the coil. Is that normal? I have never checked that before. Thanks for the advice Schlich. I'll post the results as soon as I can try it.
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Tuesday, July 10th, 2007 AT 4:57 PM
Tiny
LILSCHLICH
  • MEMBER
There is not an inline fuse for the coil pack that could have blown. If you have no fuses blown and the connection from the coil pack to the ingition module under the distributor are good then I would replace the coil pack. I am not sure on the 4V decrease when turning the motor over. It will decreas a little due to the fact that while you are trying to start the motor the alternator is not feeding power to the coil pack, you are using power stright from the battery. I would think you would only have a drop of 1 to 2 Volts. I would ask the guys at your local parts store.
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Wednesday, July 11th, 2007 AT 2:42 PM

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