1989 Chevy Corsica cranks and dies

Tiny
MOOSE44
  • MEMBER
  • 1989 CHEVROLET CORSICA
  • 6 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 160,000 MILES
I have taken on a mission project with some guys at church. Car will start for a few seconds then shut off. We replaced the fuel filters, plugs, wires, pcv valve, changed oil. Found that if you crank it and hold the switch in start mode, releasing enough to allow starter to drop out it will run as long as key is held there. Replaced ignition switch. No change. Traced wires out of switch to see where power goes. Fuse #4 & #8. If we remove #4 alt fuse, car will run but not charge. Took alternator to local shop that rebuilds them. Bench tested 14v.100 amp. Diodes good. Battery will hold a charge from a 110 charger. While car is running with #4 fuse out, I can touch fuse and charge gauge will jump to 14 volts smooth idle, but car will die.
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Tuesday, October 12th, 2010 AT 8:55 AM

12 Replies

Tiny
JDL
  • EXPERT
Maybe I'm barking up the wrong tree, but, when the vehicle stalls, leave the key in the on position and check primary voltage at coil and injectors.
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Tuesday, October 12th, 2010 AT 9:10 AM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
I would try removing that fuse and running another wire from another power source with an inline fuse and run it to the alternator side of that fuse socket and see what happens. This is taking the ignition switch away from the alternator so we can see where this takes us.
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Tuesday, October 12th, 2010 AT 9:12 AM
Tiny
MOOSE44
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Tuesday, October 12th, 2010 AT 8:39 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
Well?
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Tuesday, October 12th, 2010 AT 8:41 PM
Tiny
MOOSE44
  • MEMBER
[/quote:3373b3f759]
Re: I have done that. As soon as the wire is touched to the + battery post the car shuts off
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Tuesday, October 12th, 2010 AT 8:41 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
Where did you take the power from?
Was it fused?
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Tuesday, October 12th, 2010 AT 8:43 PM
Tiny
MOOSE44
  • MEMBER
Power was taken from + batt post. In-line fuse is in test lead I made for this project.
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Wednesday, October 13th, 2010 AT 9:21 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
That's interesting. That means that the ignition switch is playing no part in the stalling and the alternator or the wiring is doing it completely on it's own. I might be tempted to try an alternator here. Your relying on some store's word that nothing is wrong and they could be wrong.
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Wednesday, October 13th, 2010 AT 9:26 PM
Tiny
MOOSE44
  • MEMBER
Installed "NEW" alternator and car does same thing. Was told that the 3 prong oil sending switch can go bad and shut down fuel pump. Via security circuit of car. Bought one on the way home tonight, but will be friday b4 its installed.
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Thursday, October 14th, 2010 AT 9:16 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
No, that is not true. The oil pressure sender is not designed as any kind of engine shut down. It is wired as a redundant power supply to the fuel pump so it can run without a fuel pump relay but cannot interrupt the power to the fuel pump if the relay is working.

Here is a little bit of info I found on the alternator wiring

The CS charging system has several sizes available, including the CS-121, CS-130 & CS-144 alternators. The number (121, 130 or 144) denotes the outside diameter in millimeters (mm) of the stator laminations.
CS generators use a new type regulator and a diode trio is not used. A delta stator, rectifier bridge, and rotor with slip rings and brushes are electronically similar to earlier generators. A conventional pulley and fan is used and, on the CS-130, an internal fan cools the slip ring end frame, rectifier bridge and regulator.
Unlike three wire generators, the CS generators may be used with only two connections, battery positive and an "L" terminal to the charge indicator bulb.
Use of the "P", "F", and "S" terminals is optional. The "P" terminal is connected to the stator, and may be connected externally to a tachometer or other device. The "F" terminal is connected internally to field positive, and may be used as a fault indicator. The "S" terminal may be connected externally to a voltage, such as battery voltage, to sense voltage to be controlled.
As on other charging systems, the charge indicator lights when the switch is closed, and goes out when the engine is running. If the charge indicator is on with the engine running, a charging system defect is indicated. For all kinds of defects, the indicator will be on with the engine running if system voltage is too high or too low. The regulator voltage setting varies with temperature, and limits voltage by controlling rotor field current.
This regulator switches rotor field current on and off at a fixed frequency of about 400 cycles per second. By varying the on-off time, correct average field current for proper system voltage control is obtained. At high speeds, the on time may be 10% and the off time 90%. At low speeds, with high electrical loads, on and off time may be 90% and 10%, respectively.
No periodic maintenance on the generator is required. The CS-121 and CS-130 are not repairable and may only be replaced as a single unit. The CS-144 is repairable.
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Friday, October 15th, 2010 AT 4:35 AM
Tiny
MOOSE44
  • MEMBER
Anew alternator was installed and it does the same thing. Car has a voltage gauge in dash. Have not seen a chrg light. Car still not giving any new codes.
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Friday, October 15th, 2010 AT 3:18 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
I've taken you as far as I can. You have proven that when that alternator is supplied power is when the car dies so whatever is happened is at least related to the alternator wiring. The info I just gave you says that you can operate that system with only 2 of those wires so I would try isolating them. Something on that circuit is causing the problem. It may be after it comes back out of the alternator.
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Friday, October 15th, 2010 AT 4:28 PM

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