1995 Chevy Cavalier Hazard lights and turn signals cause AB

Tiny
ARGHHH
  • MEMBER
  • 1995 CHEVROLET CAVALIER
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 95,000 MILES
When I brake hard, the brakes stutter, like the ABS is working, and then after I start moving again, it clicks a few times. I think this is just the ABS "self-test" and is normal. Correct?

However, this clicking sound also occurs if I turn on the hazard lights while parked, and then the ABS light comes on, as if there's a problem.

This also happens if the wheel is turned to the right and I turn on the right turn signal. It doesn't happen while turning left. It doesn't happen while turning right with the left turn signal or if the turn signal is off.

It happens even if I'm stopped, with the wheel turned to the right, and then the right turn signal.

I imagine this is an electrical problem, though the movement of the wheel affecting it is strange. Where might I look to figure out what's causing it?
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Thursday, July 29th, 2010 AT 9:22 AM

11 Replies

Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Hi Arghhh,

Thank you for the donation.

Does the problem occur when the steering is not turned but only the right signal is used?

Does it occur when turning left with signal turned to right?

Have you ever tried to retrieve for trouble codes?

It definitely is an electrical problem and the right turn signal is affecting the ABS system.

Both the system shares a common grounding point and I believe this could be the cause.

The grounding point is G101, at lower right front of engine compartment, behind bumper. Check if the grounding point is loose, contaminated or corroded.
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Thursday, July 29th, 2010 AT 9:59 AM
Tiny
ARGHHH
  • MEMBER
> Does the problem occur when the steering is not turned but only the right signal is used?

No.

> Does it occur when turning left with signal turned to right?

I don't think so.

> Have you ever tried to retrieve for trouble codes?

No, and I can't do this easily at Autozone, etc. Because it's not compatible. Maybe I can buy my own checker?

The check engine light has not come on.

> The grounding point is G101, at lower right front of engine compartment, behind bumper. Check if the grounding point is loose, contaminated or corroded.

Ok.
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Thursday, July 29th, 2010 AT 10:37 AM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
The DLC shown seems to be OBD-II but scanners comes in different standards so it is not surprising if Autozone does not have the correct one.

If you get any scanner, it should be equivalent to J-39200 standard.

The additional information provided indicates it is possible the front right wheel sensor wire is being affected by the wheel turning. Check the sensor wire for abrasion marks.
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Thursday, July 29th, 2010 AT 11:04 AM
Tiny
ARGHHH
  • MEMBER
I'm also having an issue with a rumbling sound when I veer right, maybe they're related. It's only while moving, while veering to the right (not left), and the sound is related to the speed of the wheel, not the speed of the engine, brakes, etc.
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Thursday, July 29th, 2010 AT 11:48 AM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
That indicates that something is brushing at the wheels and it could possibly be related. Gethe components checked to see if anything is loose or too close to each other.
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Thursday, July 29th, 2010 AT 11:57 AM
Tiny
ARGHHH
  • MEMBER
Passenger side or driver side? Do you have an illustration of this?

"1995 ELECTRICAL COMPONENT LOCATION General Motors Corp. - Electrical Component Location" says that G101 is "At left front of engine compartment."

The diagram says right side though.


http://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/269800_Schematic_1.gif

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Friday, July 30th, 2010 AT 6:21 PM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
Our database indicates it is on the right side.

The diagram is similar to the one you posted.
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Saturday, July 31st, 2010 AT 9:35 AM
Tiny
ARGHHH
  • MEMBER
Hmmm. The upper turn signal bulb was out, which I hadn't noticed, but after replacing it I still have the problem. If I remove both upper and lower right turn signal/park bulbs, it still happens. I don't understand why. It doesn't happen for the left side even if I remove the left side bulb.

I don't see a ground point on the passenger side of the car, just a bundle of wires traveling across from behind the bumper, which splits into a bunch of stuff like turn signals, headlights, and horn.

I measure 16 ohms or less from the turn signal bulb terminals to the alternator body.
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Saturday, July 31st, 2010 AT 3:06 PM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
16 ohms is rather high resistance indicating the grounding is insufficient. Use a jumper to provide alternative ground for teh circuit to test if it affects anything.
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Sunday, August 1st, 2010 AT 3:06 AM
Tiny
ARGHHH
  • MEMBER
The problem is only occurring with the hazard lights now, I think because I replaced the bulb. I can live with this, since it won't happen during normal driving, but I'd like to know why it's happening.

I tried to follow the wires for the lights, and I think I found the grounding lugs on the driver's side of the engine compartment in front and below the battery (not really "behind the bumper", though), but they're not really accessible. I was only able to see them by getting under the car and sticking my hand up inside with a digital camera. There's no way I could loosen or tighten them without taking other things apart. They don't look very corroded, though.

http://s952.photobucket.com/albums/ae1/carproblems/ABS%20electrical%20and%20rire%20rumbling/

I also loosened two ground points on the engine itself, and wire brushed them shiny and put them back on, and wire brushed the battery connectors. I don't think it made much difference to anything.
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Sunday, August 1st, 2010 AT 8:20 PM
Tiny
KHLOW2008
  • EXPERT
The manual does not indicate the exact grounding point and since there are a few we do not know which is the actual one. After fiddling, though you might attribute it to the changed bulb, it could be that the tugging at the grounding points that had improved the situation. At the turn signal, splice a wire into the ground wire and provide an alternative ground somewhere easier to install to retest. That would eliminate the possibility of the ground circuit being the cause if it does not help.

Where tight places are concerned, it never is easy to work with unless obstructing components are removed. The use of flexible couplings might work if they are available.
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Sunday, August 1st, 2010 AT 11:12 PM

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