2002 V6 3800 Camaro Overheating And Leaking Anti-Freeze.

Tiny
QUICKSTRIKE
  • MEMBER
  • 2002 CHEVROLET CAMARO
Hello thanks in advance for any help, I have a 2002 Chevy Camaro v6 3800 series I have changed the waterpump and put it on with a aluminum head gasket from GM parts house, I put that on but my car is leaking anti-freeze from what I can tell is right behind the waterpump I aint sure what is located behind the waterpump if there is another gasket I need to replace or another part I need to take off. I am really stumped I know it aint the waterpump leaking cause it sprays out from behind the waterpump when you rev the engine up to about 2500 to 3000 rpms. Thanks again AJ
Do you
have the same problem?
Yes
No
Sunday, November 25th, 2007 AT 4:27 PM

6 Replies

Tiny
PEAR69
  • MEMBER
Aj, it sounds like you have a leaking lower intake gasket. This is a common problem. Be sure to change it with a fel-pro gasket kit. I'm not a salesman for fel-pro, it's just that these kits seem to be the best.

This site runs on small of small or large donations, please try to make one. Thanks
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Sunday, November 25th, 2007 AT 4:42 PM
Tiny
QUICKSTRIKE
  • MEMBER
Do you know the difficulty of this task compared to like changeing the waterpump? And thanks.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Sunday, November 25th, 2007 AT 4:44 PM
Tiny
QUICKSTRIKE
  • MEMBER
Would you be able to recommend anykind of temporary fix for this manifold gasket leak I have confirmed that is it I see where it is leaking out of. Would the best thing for me to do is take it to a mechanic shop and have them install the new gaskets? And would you happen to have an estimate on how much this would cost? Thanks P.S. Would like to try to find somekind of intake manifold gasket leak sealant like a radiator additive I have heard of a product called, Blue Devil Engine and Cooling Sealant
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Sunday, November 25th, 2007 AT 5:40 PM
Tiny
PEAR69
  • MEMBER
This job will cost anywhere from 400 to 900 bucks at a garadge. To do it yourself, you can save a lot of money, and you should obtain a Haynes repair manual for your car. All the procedures and specs are in it. Compaired to changing a water pump, it's a little more involved, but not impossible. The hardest part is getting to the lower intake to get it off. Removing all the stuff requires patience and close attention to details like tagging wires and such to ease the installation. Never put any type of cooling system sealer in your engine. Sealers plug up important cooling passages. I do not care what the lable says.
I suggest using the fel-pro lower intake gasket kit. These gaskets seem to perform better than the GM gaskets.
No matter who fixes your problem, it must be done soon--here's why. The leak will only get worse and eventually coolant will leak into your oil. This will cause severe engine damage. If you decide to do this job yourself I will help you through it, but be sure to obtain a Haynes repair manual--read it through first--and be prepaired to have your car down for at-least 2 or 3 days.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Sunday, November 25th, 2007 AT 8:24 PM
Tiny
QUICKSTRIKE
  • MEMBER
I have a haynes repair manual and I am gonna give it a shot at doing it myself, I have advanced mechanic exp. Been around race cars all my life and my grandpa is a master mechanic. I am gonna pull it in the garage tommorow morning and start takeing things off. Where should I start? Besides the basics like battery cable disconnect and all that. What should I remove first the alternator, the waterpump? I just need a good start and am I looking at unplugging a bunch of wires? What would be the best thing to use to identify where they went masking tape and marker? I appreciate the help. And I gotta do both sides. Both sides are leaking.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Sunday, November 25th, 2007 AT 11:06 PM
Tiny
PEAR69
  • MEMBER
The job requires mostly getting things out of the way. Drain the coolant down below the deck of the block. Off the top of my head take off the: the whole air intake plentum including the filter box, serpentine belt, engine fan, upper radiator hose, etc. If it has air you'll have to move the compressor out of the way. Get some wire tags or duct tape to tag the sensor wires you'll have to disconnect. The engine wire harness is routed a certain way, take note of this becuse you need to move most of it out of the way, and this routing helps when reinstalling. You must remove the distributer. Now pay attention, before you remove the distributer, take the spark plugs out and bring no. 1 cylinder up to TDC on the compression stroke. Take the distributer cap off look, there is a 6 or an arrow stamped on the plastic deck of the distributer. The rotor should be pointing at this mark. If it's not you are on the wrong end of the stroke. Make your own mark to reference the rotor to the cap deck and make a mark to reference the dist. Base to the lower intake where it bolts down. A sharpie works for this. Then you can take the dist. Out. Remove the fuel lines that go into the injectors very carefully because there are o-rings inside the injector fuel bowl.
The goal with stripping every thing off is to make it as easy as possible to take the lower intake manifold off but keep in mind that you must put it back on without scraping the gaskets and such.
The intake has an upper and lower half. The upper is plastic. It is bolted to the lower half which is aluminium. You do not have to take the upper half off to remove the lower intake manifold. The lower manifold is held on with 8 bolts, 4 on each side. Follow the removal proceedure in the manual, this is very important so you don't warp the manifold. The fel-pro kit has every thing you need gasket wise to do the job. It also contains the upper manifold gaskets as well. It's up to you whether or not you want to change these gaskets too. If you do, remove it after you take the lower manifold off the car, and it is VERY VERY IMPORTANT that you remove the 10mm nuts or studs in the reverse sequence of the torque sequence. The nuts or studs have the sequence number stamped right next to the stud. There is around 12 or so studs holding the upper manifold on and remember it is plastic, so it's fragile and very easily warped so be carefull.
I use gray silicone to seal the front and back of the manofold instead of the stuff you get with the kit. It seems to work better because it's designed for sealing under torque loads. Put thin coat of silicone around the water passages on the heads, this seals that area better. Oh yea, check the distributer gear for any wear. I've seen them wear out. Also when you put the distributer back in--you should take the car to someone with a scan tool that could check and adjust the cam timing. This cannot be done with a timing light because the computer automaticly sets the advance. It's very hard to set the distributer back in exactly where it needs to be and believe me the cam timing is extremely sensitive. It just takes a few hundreths of an inch to be way off. Be sure not to start up the engine right away when you are done, you must allow time for the silicone to dry. I let it sit over-night to be sure. Let me know how you make out. Be patient and clean. Remember you are going to expose the bearings and crank to the outside world TAKE PRECAUTIONS FOR THIS. And no matter how tempting it is, DO NOT touch or scrape any of the hard sludge build up you will see in the oil gallery of the block. If you do you mine-as-well pull the engine and rebuild the lower half of the engine. It will fall into the bearings and destroy everything ( I learned this one the hard way)
Well AJ, good luck and BTW I used to work on World Of Outlaw Sprint Race Cars.
Was this
answer
helpful?
Yes
No
Monday, November 26th, 2007 AT 2:22 AM

Please login or register to post a reply.

Recommended Guides