2004 Chevy Blazer Compressor bypass pulley

Tiny
BENNIEKONG
  • MEMBER
  • 2004 CHEVROLET BLAZER
  • 6 CYL
  • 4WD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 64,000 MILES
I have 2 ac related questions; hope you don't mind.
Is there a compressor bypass pulley for a 2004 blazer?

My other question; if I go ahead and replace ac system compressor evap. Acu. Etc, can I drive it to a shop for a evac. And recharge or must system be charged prior to any driving?
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Thursday, September 23rd, 2010 AT 11:25 AM

10 Replies

Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
No, I don't see a bypass made for that engine. Yes, it can be driven to the shop for evacuate and recharge but I hope you realize what your getting into. The compressor is no big deal but you mentioned evaporator. If attempt to change one of those, you will really regret that. You also need to know some technique when working on A/C. You need to be able to seal things with no leaks and be able to recognize something that will be a problem.
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Thursday, September 23rd, 2010 AT 11:44 AM
Tiny
BENNIEKONG
  • MEMBER
Thanks for the answer. I will flush rather than get into trouble. What happened is the bearing in pulley went kaput while my wife was driving; loud stereo meant she did not hear the commotion under the hood. When she finally noticed and let me know, the clutch plate looked like it was burnt pretty bad. I pulled the clutch assembly off and just assumed that the compressor was shot as well due to the damage to the clutch. Shouldn't I be able to turn the shaft with the clutch hub? I was unable to by hand.
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Thursday, September 23rd, 2010 AT 11:55 AM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
OK, it's not the evaporator your referring to. That's in the dash. Your concerned about the condenser and rightfully so.

It doesn't sound like a bearing problem. It sounds like the compressor seized up which means it sent metal particles all through the system, mainly the condenser. Sometimes they can be flushed but some cannot. That's where the experience comes in. You have to determine if your condenser is a "bypass" type which cannot be flushed and has to be replaced. If it's a "serpentine" type, then it can be flushed but you need the right chemical and correct tools to do that.

You also have to determine what caused the original compressor failure because it will simply do it again if not resolved. These are the reasons that A/C repair is really not a DIY type repair.
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Thursday, September 23rd, 2010 AT 12:03 PM
Tiny
BENNIEKONG
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Is ther a way to tell which type I have? The car was recently purchased from an older lady who's husband passed away. I suspect that the vehicle sat for some time maybe even a year or more.
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Thursday, September 23rd, 2010 AT 12:19 PM
Tiny
BENNIEKONG
  • MEMBER
I have a really good friend who is a certified mech. He allowed me to shadow him on an ac job but it was several years ago and on older car as well; a ford.
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Thursday, September 23rd, 2010 AT 12:23 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
You have to physically look at the sides of the condenser. You look at the tubes and see if they are all fed from a central pipe/manifold than rund vertically which would make it a bypass type and non-flushable. If you see one continuous tube then serpentines back and forth in the condenser, then you can usually flush that type.
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Thursday, September 23rd, 2010 AT 12:23 PM
Tiny
BENNIEKONG
  • MEMBER
Cool thanks. I just pulled my Haynes out and it has some good pictures of the side of the condensor. I know it's apples and oranges between the two, auto and home ac, but I have done some work for my wife's uncle who is an HVAC tech. I know how important the system has to function all the way thru, only as good as the weakest link.
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Thursday, September 23rd, 2010 AT 12:30 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
Don't go by the manual pictures. You have to see what is actually in your truck.
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Thursday, September 23rd, 2010 AT 12:33 PM
Tiny
BENNIEKONG
  • MEMBER
Definitely, I was just using the book for visual reff. I'm about to go take a look. I've already ordered a new compressor and accumulator. In my original question I was trying to find out if a total component replacement was required as apposed to a flush. I knew with catastrophic comp. Failure you get schrapnel throughout. Also, was going to install an inline filter.
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Thursday, September 23rd, 2010 AT 12:48 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
I usually pass on the filters. They are just another place for a problem to occur. Just either replace or flush completely the condenser and replace the orifice tube for sure.
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Thursday, September 23rd, 2010 AT 1:33 PM

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