Car has just recently stalled out randomly

Tiny
DAKPLUMB0329
  • MEMBER
  • 2006 PONTIAC G6
  • 3.6L
  • V6
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 144,000 MILES
Just recently my car had stalled out like I had no gas in it getting on highway. Checked all fluids and gas and everything was normal. Started it up about an hour later and made it maybe two miles and then same thing. Would make it to about sixty mph and then just shut down. Have had the security light randomly pop up on dashboard periodically but it has been doing that for about seven months. Had to get it towed back to wife's grandma's house. When I went to plug in diagnostic reader it is giving me nothing because no engine light is on. Car does sound like there is no oil but I have checked and it is fine. What could be the problem?
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Tuesday, June 20th, 2017 AT 11:24 PM

16 Replies

Tiny
RANDY B
  • EXPERT
Whether or not there are diagnostic fault codes has nothing to do with the check engine light being on. The engine computer can detect over 2,000 defects. About half of them refer to things that could adversely affect emissions. Those are the codes that turn the check engine light on.

Intermittent stalling is commonly caused by a crankshaft position sensor or camshaft position sensor that is failing by becoming heat-sensitive. The clue is they will work again after cooling down for about an hour. When the engine Will not run with a failed sensor, it cannot pollute excessively, so it is likely the check engine light Will not turn on.

Also, be aware that on some models, a fault code Will not set for a failed cam or crank sensor just from cranking the engine. That can incorrectly make you think those sensors are okay. Instead, you need to look at them with a scanner to see if their signals are arriving at the engine computer.
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Tuesday, June 20th, 2017 AT 11:45 PM
Tiny
DAKPLUMB0329
  • MEMBER
Yes it does turn on after a certain length of time. But it is making noses like there's no oil but al fluids are correct. Could that be the crankshaft not properly turning
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Thursday, June 22nd, 2017 AT 11:52 AM
Tiny
RANDY B
  • EXPERT
Have you used a scanner to see if the sensor signals are arriving at the computer?

I am not sure what kind of noise you are hearing. Part of what you are describing suggests the flex plate is broken. The starter would sound weird. It would spin too fast and steady. The crankshaft would not rotate during cranking.
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Thursday, June 22nd, 2017 AT 4:24 PM
Tiny
DAKPLUMB0329
  • MEMBER
I have just used a code scanner like I mentioned before. Do I have to take it to a garage to have that tested or is there a way I can test it myself. My Gpa was a mechanic and left me and my father a lot of tools. Is there a certain way to test it.
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Friday, June 23rd, 2017 AT 4:52 PM
Tiny
RANDY B
  • EXPERT
Reading diagnostic fault codes is just a tiny percentage of what scanners do. One of their main uses is viewing the live data the computers see and act on. That is what we need to do when there are no fault codes to get us started. Even when there are fault codes, those only indicate the circuit or system that has the problem. I'd equate your code reader to your family physician, and your body to all the computers in your car. You can read fault codes, but only in the Engine Computer. Your physician can figure out which part of you has the problem, but then he has to send you to the specialist. The fault code gets you to the circuit, but you may need the scanner, (the specialist), to view the incoming sensor data, command outputs to activate, and watch what happens when you force defective conditions to occur.

When the people at auto parts stores read fault codes for you, they almost always are using a simple code reader like you are, and they only read codes in the Engine Computer. Mechanics use scanners that can access all the computers on the vehicle, and provide a lot more information, but they also cost about 100 times as much as a code reader. To make it even more insulting, some of the more popular scanners "only" cost around $4000.00, but the company charges $1000.00 per year for the updates, and you can't skip any years. That's why shops have to charge for using them.

You've reached the mechanic's dilemma where there are no fault codes to get us started. And remember, even if you did find a fault code, they never say to replace parts or that one is bad. Even when a part is referenced in a code, that part is actually the cause of that code about half of the time. They just get us into the circuit with the problem. With no code to go on, you have to use the scanner to figure out what looks wrong.

I should mention too that sensors develop a signal voltage, and to use a common 5-volt sensor for my sad example, its acceptable range of signal voltage would typically be 0.5 to 4.5 volts. The problem is if it develops the wrong voltage, the computer will act on it, as long as it stays within that acceptable range. It has to go below 0.5 volt or above 4.5 volts to set a code. We have to be smart enough to know that 3.0 volts is an acceptable voltage, but it's the wrong voltage if it doesn't agree with the condition. For example, at idle, a throttle position sensor will read near 0.5 volts. It had better not be reading 4.2 volts if we aren't pushing the accelerator pedal.

The position sensors I described earlier develop a different type of signal. Voltage has nothing to do with what the computer reacts to. Those are timing pulses, and voltage is not that important. There is no easy way to observe those pulses, and if we did, there would be no way to figure out if they're showing up at the right time. The computer does that, then it talks back and forth with the scanner so it can display that information.
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Friday, June 23rd, 2017 AT 6:08 PM
Tiny
DAKPLUMB0329
  • MEMBER
I comprehend everything ur telling me too the fullest. I'm aware of the fact that this is not a common problem and really value the time that u have spent talking with me. Back of my head told me I would have to take it somewhere for professional diagnosis. I'm service plumber so I can relate. I will try and find a mechanic with good rep where I am currently at. I appreciate and respect the time u have giving me. Thanks again man. When I find out the problem I will email u so u can add it to ur arsenal. Thanks again
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Sunday, June 25th, 2017 AT 10:31 PM
Tiny
KEN L
  • ADMIN
Please let us know what happens.

Cheers, Ken
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Wednesday, June 28th, 2017 AT 5:14 PM
Tiny
ROXTED
  • MEMBER
  • 2006 PONTIAC G6
Engine Performance problem
2006 Pontiac G6 6 cyl Front Wheel Drive Automatic

after driving about 30 min. Engine dies while driving, then hard to start. Once started idles rough. Already replaced mass air flow sensor, and had the catalitic convertor checked out.
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Tuesday, June 11th, 2019 AT 1:18 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JOE F
  • EXPERT
Have you checked fuel pump pressure? Also, has the check engine light come on?

Let me know.
Joe
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Tuesday, June 11th, 2019 AT 1:18 PM (Merged)
Tiny
GEORGIY
  • MEMBER
  • 2006 PONTIAC G6
  • 70,000 MILES
Hello I own a Pontiac G6 2006. When the car is running idle, I unhook the positive wire from the battery and the car shuts off. Eventually the battery goes dead, which could mean the alternator is not charging the battery
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Tuesday, June 11th, 2019 AT 1:18 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JOE F
  • EXPERT
When you remove the positive, you open the circuit. Thus, it dies. As far as the alt and battery, I recommend having both checked. Most parts stores will do it for free.
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Tuesday, June 11th, 2019 AT 1:18 PM (Merged)
Tiny
BILLYSTHEMAN
  • MEMBER
  • 2005 PONTIAC G6
  • 208,000 MILES
While driving down the road the car will suddenly die without any warning. Then it will. Start right back up as if nothing happened. But it does it more and more frequently now. I don't know if. This has anything to do with the problem but the radio hasn't worked and about a week ago it started working again right before the car started dying.
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Tuesday, June 11th, 2019 AT 1:19 PM (Merged)
Tiny
JOE F
  • EXPERT
This sounds like a classic crankshaft angle sensor which will cause the problem you have described.

Here is a a guide to help you see what you are in for when doing the job.

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/crankshaft-angle-sensor-replacement

When this sensor goes out it will not trigger a check engine light.

This guide can help as well

https://www.2carpros.com/articles/engine-stalls

Here is the location for your car

Check out the diagrams (Below)

Let us know what happens and please upload pictures or videos of the problem.

Cheers
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Tuesday, June 11th, 2019 AT 1:19 PM (Merged)
Tiny
BILLYSTHEMAN
  • MEMBER
Thanks for the heads up, I got a sensor from Amazon for $56.00 and have not had a problem since. Thanks I love this site.
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Tuesday, June 11th, 2019 AT 1:19 PM (Merged)
Tiny
G6NOTFLYING
  • MEMBER
I have a similar issue with my 2007 G6, except it stalls out when I am stopped with my foot on the brake. It will start right up again with no problem. It will also jerk occasionally when I accelerate. I took it to a mechanic who had it for over a week. They cleaned out the whole air filtration system and replaced the cam sensor. They thought it was fixed but the problem started up again the next day. I'm trying fuel treatment next but I'm getting really frustrated with it now.
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Saturday, December 21st, 2019 AT 5:05 PM
Tiny
RANDY B
  • EXPERT
Fuel additives aren't going to solve anything. Most of those are just concentrated versions of what is already added to gasoline. Contaminated gas would cause very different symptoms than stalling at idle.

The better approach is to connect a scanner with "record" capabilities. Some mechanics call them "flight recorders". During a test-drive, when the problem occurs, you press the "record" button. That takes a few-second snap shot of the sensors you've selected. Since the data passes through the scanner's memory, the recording actually starts a few seconds before you pressed the button. That recording can be played back slowly, later, to see what changed. This can show if the Engine Computer reacted to a sensor signal; that changed, or if something else occurred
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Saturday, December 21st, 2019 AT 6:17 PM

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