Oil in coolant

Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
Guys,
Thanks so much for input to a frustrating area with many emotions. As peers and mentors, I have benefitted greatly in a short period of time on this forum. This forum is playing an important role to help dispell some of the paranoia that surrounds the Auto repair world. Be it some of the parnoia is valid. The new forum Mike mentioned will be a great avenue to contine paving better relations. I appreciate the requested input.

I do apologize for some of my antics, some serve a purpose, and some demean my charactor. I get a little carried away at times. My personality is what it is, but will try to stay more even-keeled.

Thanks again for the responses on this matter and in such a timely fashion.
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Saturday, February 10th, 2007 AT 11:12 AM
Tiny
MATHIASO
  • MEMBER
. Hey Paul! You are giving opportunities to all of us to give our point of view on these subjects: they are so important for our self, our productivity, our employer or employee, our customers, relationship technicians have to each other. All of these are a part of our obligation as automotive technicians, and all are connected to our reputation and the reputation of the shop as follow, either bad or good.
I want to start with :
1/ Honesty.
Employers and customer expect and deserve honesty from automotive technician. Honesty create feeling of trust among technicians, employers and customers. Things like changing unnecessary parts and charging the customer for it, or the customer misleading the technician about the real cause of the problem making it more hard for the technician to find out after many costly diagnosis.
2/ Attitude: Employees should maintain a positive attitude at all times. Automotive technician have days when it may be difficult to maintain a positive attitude; for example, there will be days when the technical problem on a certain vehicle are difficult to solve. However developing a negative attitude certainly will not help the situation. A positive attitude has a positive effect on the job situation as well as on the customer.
3/ TEAMWORK/ :D THIS ONE IS IMPORTANT.
The shop staff is a team. The 2carpro. Com moderators are a team. We should cooperate with and care about. Cooperative teamwork help to improve shop efficiency. For example As moderator if I disagree with another moderator about the right procedure to do the job, I will send him or her a private message telling him or her what I think, but not arguing or putting the co worker down in front of the customers. Remember this: Engineers :) who make cars make also mistake. This is why we see a lot of recalls. :Lol:
Customers may be turn off by bickering between shop personnel or between moderators.
Productivity: As automotive technicians, we have a responsibility to our employer/ shop to make the best possible use of time on the job. We are paid for our skills, effort and time.
Let's comeback to real life :D
Most People go to the doctor when they are sick or they go the dentist only when they have tooth pain
? Well, they do the same for their car too, and sometime when things get worse and they are looking for very cheap labor combine with a job well done. There are also some peoples out there who do not care how much it will cost to fix it but just a good job done so they do not have to come back for the same problem.

Here is my conclusion:
We have specific responsibility regarding each job performed on a customer's vehicle.
Our reputation and the reputation of the shop are connected to each other. The key to the reputation is the " Winn, Winn business" not " Winn, loose business"

Hey Paul! :) Thanks for this opportunity and thanks for everybody giving their view so we can get know each other.
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Saturday, February 10th, 2007 AT 11:20 AM
Tiny
PEPPERMRJ
  • MEMBER
I will have to agree with Chris (aka carundell) that it would seem to be a coolant flow issue.

Mechanical thermostats are one of the few passive items left on a car. With the next generation OBD systems that will set a code for low coolant temps, I think we will see a more dynamic alternative for this valve in the future.

Good luck and let us know what turns up. :)
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Saturday, February 10th, 2007 AT 1:44 PM
Tiny
CARUNDELL
  • MEMBER
MJ. Well said my friend! Thats the exact point we're here! Let the experts give guidance and knowlege! And save the customer BIG $$$

Mathiaso. So very glad you weighed in! Teamwork is point I didn't touch on and so very glad you did! Drop the egos and give help when help is needed!

Paul. My piasono, goumba, padawan of the real techs. Don't You Dare Change A THING! Got it?

Suze? Where are you girl?

Chris

p.S. Idriveatitleist weighed in with an interesting post. Don't forget it!
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Saturday, February 10th, 2007 AT 1:46 PM
Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
I'll second the teamwork thoughts.

I don't worry too much about the 100,000 mile thing so much anymore. I have seen plugs go that far and more. Not that I would have myself nor recommend it. But I just had a toyota in the shop with 65,000 miles on it, original plugs, and sold a set of plugs. When I pulled them out, (yes, I really do get my paws dirty), they were practically perfect, ai little anti-seze and they went back in. Seems to depend on some factor as to there wear, not sure what yet. I am more fearful of plugs that are difficult to access, and let them get too far for the fear of snapping them.

On the coolant, seems like 5 years hit well before the 150,000 miles. I switch to the universal long life and recommend every 3 years to change. The Blue coolant is a 2 year coolant.
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Saturday, February 10th, 2007 AT 6:55 PM
Tiny
JACK42
  • EXPERT
Back to the original problem. Good call Chris with the blocking off of the radiator. My father drove semi's my whole life, knew just what needed to be blocked by the temp outside to keep the engine running at the proper temp. Engine temp at some point will be dictated by outside temp. Cant tell you how many customers complain " I was headed to Vegas, it was 120 degrees out at 1 in the afternoon and I had the A/C on, my car ran warmer and my A/C didnt get as cold as it does at home where it is 90 degrees"
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Sunday, February 11th, 2007 AT 7:52 AM
Tiny
SUZE
  • MEMBER
My first post, please bear with me.

On the subject of Dexcool- the purpose of an extended life coolant serves a desire on the part of a consumer to have their vehicle be "maintenence free". This is the same theory that drives the 7500 mi. Oil change, or the 100,000 mi. Spark plug. I can't conceive of desgners building in "failed obsolesence", so I must think that they actually do feel that these theories will be borne out under field conditions.
The number of gasket failures that I see with vehicles using Dexcool is incredible. I think that the coolant itself is fine, not for 100,000, but it's not a bad product. It does cause problems, however, when combined with plastic intakes or inferior gasket material. Add to this the fact that vehicle owners who were weaned on green will arbitrarily lift their hood and dump some antifreeze in their overflow regardless of the color that is in there. Now you have a problem that is exponentially multiplied.
I beleive that adding to the issue is marketing. The consumer wants to think about vehicle maintenence as little as possible. They see a vehicle marketed as maintenence free for 100,000. So I see a breakdown come into the shop with 40,000 mi. On it, and the oil (what's left of it) is sludge. Have to heat the pan with a torch to get it out. The woman says "well, I bought the car because it was maintenence free". These people are not stupid, they just bought the bill of goods that was marketed to them.
Granted, I see vehicles that are out of manufacturer warranty. I do know that when there are issues with a particular component, the issues are generally addressed by the manufacturer. Eventually. Sometimes longer. (Case in point, Ford/Mazda trannys- did they get that right yet?) In the meantime, when a vehicle running Dexcool comes in, even without problems, I consistently suggest a coolant flush and conversion.
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Sunday, February 11th, 2007 AT 8:20 AM
Tiny
CARUNDELL
  • MEMBER
Suze!
Welcome to the gang! And great first post, looking fwd to more! Feel free to help out in anyway!

Chris
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Sunday, February 11th, 2007 AT 8:58 AM
Tiny
SUZE
  • MEMBER
In response to idriveatitleist and the wife's Rendezvous-

The outside temp is not going to have such a huge effect on internal engine temp just due to air flow around the motor. It does sound as if the coolant is being overly cooled. Possible that the radiator has too large of a capacity, shield or shroud placement, even fin design. Makes perfect sense that fuel mileage decreases due to rich mixture when ECM doesn't detect optimum temp; isn't it nice when they operate as intended?
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Sunday, February 11th, 2007 AT 10:22 AM
Tiny
SERVICE WRITER
  • EXPERT
Hey Suze!
Welcome aboard, Chris said you would joining and you certainly met his accolades!


https://www.2carpros.com/forum/automotive_pictures/30961_happy4_1.jpg



The comments on the air flow dropping the coolant temp. in the rendesvous leaves me to the conclusion of try a small piece of cardboard on the radiator for a test.
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Sunday, February 11th, 2007 AT 11:26 AM

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