Broke something in the oil pressure switch

Tiny
CLARK313
  • MEMBER
  • 2000 PONTIAC GRAND AM
  • 2.4L
  • 4 CYL
  • FWD
  • AUTOMATIC
  • 150,000 MILES
I had an oil leak from the oil pressure switch. Tried replacing guess I tightened it to tight and broke where it goes in at. Trying to figure out what that part of the engine is and how expensive it would be to fix. If possible. Its on the 2.4L Twin Cam in my car. It is located just under the front cam cover. Sorry I cannot be more specific not very smart when it comes to cars. Obviously.
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Tuesday, February 14th, 2017 AT 7:16 AM

10 Replies

Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
Should not be hard to remove the snapped off piece from the hole and install a new one. They are a tapered thread. The issue is that you need to remove it without generating any filings or metal shavings. A decent shop should be able to handle it without much fuss.
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Tuesday, February 14th, 2017 AT 8:06 AM
Tiny
CLARK313
  • MEMBER
I broke the engine itself not the oil pressure switch.
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Tuesday, February 14th, 2017 AT 11:19 AM
Tiny
HMAC300
  • EXPERT
Get an easy out at auto parts get it inside switch and try to back it out then replace the switch. It goes into the engine block.
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Tuesday, February 14th, 2017 AT 12:17 PM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
If you actually cracked the cam housing that it screws into, getting a used piece from a salvage yard, would probably be the best bet.
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Tuesday, February 14th, 2017 AT 4:05 PM
Tiny
CLARK313
  • MEMBER
Yes I cracked the cam housing. Did not know the name of it. Thanks. How hard is that piece to replace.
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Wednesday, February 15th, 2017 AT 3:29 AM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
Not a bad job if you have the proper tools. It has to come apart just like doing the timing chain because you will need to retract the tension-er to get the timing chain loose.
Then once the chain is off you can pull the housing and check the replacement part for any wear on the cam or lifters. If they are worn (need to be measured very precisely) you will want to transfer the cam and lifters from the current part to the replacement, being very careful to make sure they go into the same positions they were in. With the mileage you have you will want to do a timing set while it's apart.

Price wise you would be looking at the replacement cam housing, full timing set (with sliders and tension-er), a top end gasket kit at a minimum.
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Wednesday, February 15th, 2017 AT 8:39 AM
Tiny
CLARK313
  • MEMBER
Okay, thanks for the help. Got me a project for the weekend.
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Wednesday, February 15th, 2017 AT 8:49 PM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
Thank you for using 2CarPros. Com.

Please let us know how the repair turns out as it may help others with similar problems.
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Wednesday, February 15th, 2017 AT 9:12 PM
Tiny
CLARK313
  • MEMBER
Quick question will I need any special tools? Because I don't have any specific tools just basics. Like I had to get a special socket in order to get the oil pressure switch off.
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Thursday, February 16th, 2017 AT 11:41 PM
Tiny
STEVE W.
  • EXPERT
There are a few special tools involved. Most should be available as rental/borrowed items from a parts store.
Get a copy of the book for that vehicle before you tear into it, there are specific steps to take in order to avoid damage. I suggest either or Alldata both have DIY access where you get the same information used by shops to do repairs. Runs 25-30 dollars for one vehicle for a year of access. Gives you the ability to look at the pictures and see how it's done.

Mitchell - http://www.eautorepair.net
AllDATAdiy - https://www.alldatadiy.com
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Friday, February 17th, 2017 AT 1:57 AM

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