2008 Chevrolet Silverado chips and tuners

Tiny
CHARLIE1229
  • MEMBER
  • 2008 CHEVROLET SILVERADO
  • 32,000 MILES
I was looking at getting some sort of performance upgrade. I do not know what would be better, a tuner or a chip. I was looking at the Bully Dog GT tuner. Any thoughts on which is better or what the difference really is?
Thank you.
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Friday, November 1st, 2013 AT 10:49 AM

3 Replies

Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
They are one in the same. They both simply modify the operating system which by the way is against Federal law and carries a $25000 fine.
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Friday, November 1st, 2013 AT 12:36 PM
Tiny
MADMIKE1735
  • EXPERT
Where did you get the info this is illegal? I cant find any info stating that you cannot make any changes to an automobile. Thats direct from usa. Gov they are cracking down on pollution bigtime, but that goes towards the clean air act. For the $25,000 dollar fine, ill give them my address, im guilty! Hahaha. I dont own anything stock.
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Saturday, November 2nd, 2013 AT 9:29 PM
Tiny
WRENCHTECH
  • EXPERT
It is illegal to modify the operating system of any emissions certified vehicle and that even includes the exhaust system. I agree is is rarely enfored but it certainly can be.

No Tampering
WARNING: In the U.S.A. Or Canada, federal law makes it illegal for ANYONE to tamper with, disconnect, remove or otherwise render inoperative ANY automotive emissions related control device. In general, the entire fuel system and all its individual components (including the EFI ECU) are considered 'emissions related control devices'. The penalties for tampering can be substantial. A violation may make you liable for a fine of $2,500 or even more!
"Tampering" means replacing or disabling any emissions related components (i.E. Any components that would, or could, affect any vehicle emissions) with an unapproved replacement part. It originally applied primarily to 'professional mechanics' operating from licensed repair facilities.
Revisions to the U.S. Clean Air Act in 1990 (40 CFR Title 2, Part A, Section 203) further broadened the definition of emissions tampering to include virtually ANY type of engine or exhaust system modification, performed by anyone, that alters, or might alter, what comes out the tail pipe. That means any nonstock aftermarket part that is installed on your engine must be EPA-approved and emissions legal (except on the exempt vehicles noted below) if you will be driving on public roads. Canadian federal clean air laws are very similar.
However, federal anti-tampering law does not apply to race cars that are not operated on the street, other full-time off-road vehicles, show cars that are not street driven, or vehicles not factory equipped with emission controls (most 1967 and earlier vehicles). So that exempts all antique cars, and many classic cars and muscle cars.
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Sunday, November 3rd, 2013 AT 4:09 AM

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